Here's New England!: A Guide to Vacationland

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A L O N G T H E
C O N N E C T I C U T S H O R E
Coastal Villages and Whaling Towns

Conn. State line, 27 m. east of Columbus Circle, N.Y. City.

LONG crescents of white sand; sailboats in spanking breezes; deep-sea fishing as well as plentifully stocked brooks and ponds; fairways and putting greens; grass-grown breastworks, unchanged since their valiant defenders fell, pierced by British bayonets — you'll find them all along the Connecticut shoreline. Fishermen dry their nets on gear-laden wharves just as did their ancestors who sailed the uncharted Arctic in search of whales. Landscaped estates spread about luxurious country homes; hard by, simple white colonial houses are surrounded with lilacs, syringas, and beds of tiger lilies. Yacht club burgees fly from islands that once served as bases for patriotic whaleboat crews who preyed on the Tories of Long Island. Connecticut, though nearly New York, is really New England.

US 1 follows the old King's Highway. Eighteenth-century white church spires upthrust through towering elms just off the road. Rambling taverns serve modern travelers. Occasionally a milestone placed by Benjamin Franklin, when he marked the post route in 1753, may be seen half hidden by roadside shrubbery. Paul Revere, in Indian war paint, spurred a horse over this route, carrying the news of the Boston Tea Party. George Washington came up the highway to take command of the Continental forces at Boston, and the white fleur-de-lys of France floated over the brilliant uniforms and tricornes of Lafayette's men as they marched to Yorktown.

Near the New York— Connecticut line, the weathered 'salt-box' Thomas Lyon House ( 1670) is a fitting introduction to this historic region. Along the Post Road through GREENWICH, however, are few characteristics associated with New England; nor will you see from here the extensive estates of New Yorkers which line the shore and extend back into the hills. In the pasturelands to the north, these newcomers periodically ride to hounds, much to the amusement of the native fox‐ hunters who bag their game afoot.

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