Here's New England!: A Guide to Vacationland

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P L Y M O U T H A N D T H E
S O U T H S H O R E
Pilgrim Shades and Shrines

Mass. 3; Plymouth, 20 m. from Bourne, 36 m. from Boston.

BETWEEN Boston and the Cape Cod Canal lies the South Shore, a sixty-five-mile strip of white sand beaches and rolling country with salt marsh and cranberry bog in the hollows and white pine crowning the knolls. Overlooking the ocean are widely spaced summer resorts, large, solid 'cottages,' comfortable bungalows, well-groomed estates. The Shore Drive ( Mass. 3A) parallels the coastline, and as you follow it you'll get alternate glimpses of placid meadows and groves, sandy or pebbly beaches. The inland towns along the way form a patchwork landscape of lawns, shade trees, truck gardens, strawberry patches, flower farms, and nurseries. Dexterous Portuguese 'pickers' strip the bogs each year of carloads of firm, red cranberries. Tourist signs blossom out with the first leaves. The South Shore supports itself in diverse ways, but one thing its people have in common — the contented knowledge that they tread on hallowed ground, walking literally in the steps of their forefathers. They live in a region to which the rest of the nation makes patriotic pilgrimage.

QUINCY is famed for granite and distinguished citizens. At its entrance a large signboard announces in foot-high letters: 'BIRTHPLACE OF JOHN ADAMS AND JOHN QUINCY ADAMS' — to which an unknown hand has added in a charcoal scrawl the enigmatic postscript: 'and Joe Robinson.' You may visit the distinguished birthplaces (except Joe Robinson's). The John Adams Home is a little red farm‐ house enclosed by a rail fence with a turnstile. Within are a steep, winding stair, a huge central chimney and mammoth fireplace, hand-hewn beams, and a secret chamber. The John Quincy Adams Birthplace, a red salt‐ box of much the same structure, stands next door. The Vassal-Adams Mansion, later residence of the two Presidents, is a fine type of Georgian Colonial, white-clapboarded, with brick ends and five chimneys. The Colonel Josiah Quincy House, a square yellow dwelling with white block quoins and pillared portico, was originally the home of a gentleman farmer, later that of a president of Harvard College. The Dorothy Quincy

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Here's New England!: A Guide to Vacationland
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