Here's New England!: A Guide to Vacationland

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B A R H A R B O R
Luxury by the Sea

US 1, Me. 3, 102; Bar Harbor, 47 m. from Bangor.

'L'ISLE DES MONTS DÉSERTS' was the name Samuel Champlain bestowed in 1604 upon this rocky, wooded expanse of eighteen mountains and twenty-six lakes.

Long the summer capital of Society, Bar Harbor, with its adjoining resorts, has all the accoutrements of great wealth. Rambling houses are set amid acres of landscaped grounds. Motor yachts, with pennants flying, lie at anchor in the hill-guarded harbors, while out in the open water tall-masted sailing craft tack before brisk winds. Cabañas and beach clubs are gay with sophisticated throngs. Polo is played on close‐ cropped turf, and tennis against a background of mountains and lakes.

The 15,000 acres of Acadia National Park encompass lakes and mountains, seascapes and deep valleys, and cross broad Frenchman's Bay to include Schoodic Point. So skillfully engineered is the Summit Road in its climb from the valley to the windswept plateau that the grade is hardly noticeable. From the summit of Cadillac Mountain there is a magnificent view of lakes, serrated shore, and the islands below. In a deeply wooded section of the park is the Roscoe B. Jackson Memorial Laboratory for cancer research. Among the archeological exhibits of the Abbe Museum you will find relics of the mysterious Red Paint People who roamed this section long before the Indians.

You may gather the impression that Bar Harbor covers all of Mount Desert Island. Actually there are four townships, though BAR HARBOR, on the north, overshadows the rest. Squadrons of yachts and pleasure craft are moored beside grim battleships. Uniformed men come ashore on leave, and at costly evening parties many of the season's most publicized debutantes are launched. The social center is the Bar Harbor Club, on the Harbor, which was established by six of the leading hotels. In the Casino, on Cottage St., the Mount Desert Players present Greek, Shakespearean, and modern drama. The Building of Arts, outside the village, with massive columns and friezes depicting the Muses, has a terraced amphitheater where recitals by well-known musicians are given during the summer season.

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