Here's New England!: A Guide to Vacationland

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C H A M P L A I N V A L L E Y
The Arcadia of Vermont

US 2, 7; Burlington, 40 m. from Montpelier, 300 m. from New York, 230 m. from Boston.

CHAMPLAIN VALLEY, the dairy of New England, embraces some 2000 square miles of fertile stream-watered farmland. Eastward, the rolling plains slope to the foothills of the Green Mountains; westward, they merge with the flatlands along the lakeshore. Gazing at a Champlain sunset from the glass-enclosed observation tower of Mt. Philo you will be entranced by the brilliant coloring of the islands and the distant Adirondacks — peaks in profile against a flaming horizon.

Samuel Champlain discovered the great Lake in 1609; and for more than two centuries thereafter the region was the center of a bitter struggle. These waters knew the glide of Indian canoes and those of Rogers' Rangers; they mingled with the human blood shed in fierce naval battles of the Revolution and the War of 1812. Over them floated the first crude lumber rafts for Gideon King, the 'Admiral of the Lake.' In the booming forties the waters churned under huge cargoes. Today Lake Champlain's blue breast is ruffled only by the prows of sailboats, canoes, fishing-boats, and a few ferries plying between the Adirondack resorts and the Vermont side.

Along the 80-mile shore of St. Albans Bay there are beaches for every mood: motor- and sailboating, canoeing, yachting, fishing, swimming, golfing, tennis. There are any number of paths rambling along ledges overlooking the water. And always in the background the Adirondacks cutting jaggedly at the sky.

Starting down from ALBURG on US 2, in the island region of the north, notice the Stone House ( 1823), characteristic of the century-old structures scattered throughout the county.

Near ISLE LA MOTTE STATION in Burying Ground Point the Memorial Tablet honors the soldiers of the Revolution. You should visit the Shrine of St. Ann, a diminutive chapel and its sacred image in a shelter of pines; and the Site of Fort Ste. Anne, where in 1666 Captain de La Motte and his French soldiers built a fort for protection against the Mohawks. It was the first white settlement in the State, though only a temporary

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