Here's New England!: A Guide to Vacationland

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C O N N E C T I C U T ' S W E S T E R N
H I G H L A N D S
Old Taverns by Modern Roads

US 7; Canaan, 33 m. from Pittsfield, Mass., 115 m. from New York.

ON BOTH sides of the Housatonic Valley, from the seaboard to the 2355-foot heights of the Taconic Range in Connecticut's northwestern corner, extends a region of heavily wooded uplands, interlaced with excellent highways. In the valleys, tidy villages have grown up beside the streams; and on the hillsides, communities have developed around the sites of old taverns or toll-gates. This countryside, within an hour's drive of New York City, has altered but little since the Revolutionary War; the villages have retained much of their independence and their stubborn resistance to change.

In the southwestern corner, hunt and country clubs cater to owners of rural estates, but aside from these you'll discover ample opportunities for recreation on every hand. A dozen state forests, 27 state parks, and more than 70 roadside picnic areas with tables and well-kept lawns, are scattered through the western counties.

Leaving US 1, the Ethan Allen Highway ( US 7) threads through the outskirts of industrial NORWALK and continues to WILTON, where roads branch off to the right and left into the estate country.

At CANNONDALE, north of Wilton Center, mill sites on the banks of the Norwalk River show where power was generated to turn the wheels of colonial industry. Millstones today retain a certain utility value as tables, benches, and terrace steps in country gardens.

GEORGETOWN, with its screen-cloth mills and homes of the Finn shop-hands, sprawls on both sides of the highway. Roads east climb the rolling hills where Mark Twain spent his last days at Stormfield. The twin blockhouses at the gate of the Putnam Memorial Camp Ground, further ahead, mark the edge of a State Reservation where General Israel Putnam suffered with his starving troops through the critical winter of 1778-79. In the park are a Monument, a Colonial Museum, and rows of stone heaps that were formerly the chimneys of soldiers' huts. North of the reservation, on the west side of Conn. 53, stands the Mark Twain

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Here's New England!: A Guide to Vacationland
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