Chaos, Catastrophe, and Human Affairs: Applications of Nonlinear Dynamics to Work, Organizations, and Social Evolution

By Stephen J. Guastello | Go to book overview

9
The Evolution of Human Systems

This chapter is centered around the implications of NDS within the new thinking in evolutionary science that has developed in the past decade. The first section of this chapter begins with the essential concepts underlying Darwin's Origin of Species, which went unmodified for nearly a century. New paleontological findings suggest that the original theory of evolution had many loose ends, which are thought to be tied up in the new evolutionary paradigm. The new thinking in evolution is referred to as a paradigm by its central proponent because its dynamics extend well beyond the evolution of biological species into the evolution of human and social systems.

Not only do species survive through successful competition, but also through cooperation. The second section concerns the theory of competitive and cooperative games, which has a long history in conventional psychology of negotiation and conflict resolution, and which has a growing history in NDS as well. Of special concern is the evolutionary nature of gaming strategies, and more specifically, the evolution of sustainable cooperation. NDS also suggests some conflict resolution strategies that are, as yet, unknown to game theory.

The third section takes the combination of NDS and the new evolutionary thought in another direction toward population dynamics within and across spatial locations and the dynamics of urban development. The diffusion of attitudes can be represented in a similar fashion perhaps; attitude dynamics are considered in chapter 12. The fourth and fifth sections make an interesting leap from the dynamics of insect populations to workforce productivity. The fourth section proposes the theoretical

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Chaos, Catastrophe, and Human Affairs: Applications of Nonlinear Dynamics to Work, Organizations, and Social Evolution
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Acknowledgments x
  • 1 - An Invitation to Chaos 1
  • Summary 10
  • 2 - Nonlinear Dynamical Systems Theory 11
  • Summary 57
  • 3 - Metaphors, Easter Bunnies, Modeling, and Verification 59
  • Summary 97
  • 4 - Nds, Human Decision Making, and Cognitive Processes 99
  • Summary 123
  • 5 - Dynamics of Motivation and Conflict 124
  • Summary 173
  • 6 - Stress and Human Performance 175
  • 7 - Accidents and Risk Analysis 205
  • Summary 231
  • 8 - Stress-Related Illness 232
  • Summary 256
  • 9 - The Evolution of Human Systems 257
  • Summary 298
  • 10 - Innovation, Creativity, and Complexity 301
  • Summary 328
  • 11 - The Dynamical Nature of Organizational Development 329
  • Summary 365
  • 12 - Chaos, Revolution, and War 367
  • Epilogue: Nothing Stops These Elephants 395
  • References 402
  • Author Index 426
  • Subject Index 435
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