The Prisoners of Insecurity: Nuclear Deterrence, the Arms Race, and Arms Control

By Bruce M. Russett | Go to book overview

7
Restraints in War

[If someone were] to lose his little finger tomorrow he would not sleep tonight, but, provided he never saw them, he would snore with the most profound security over the ruin of a hundred million of his brethren.

Adam Smith, The Wealth of Nations


ETHICS AND WAR

In our discussion of arms races and deterrence, we have concentrated on such questions as the following: What has been the historic experience? What are some analytical perspectives that may help us understand these complex issues? What evidence is there to support assertions about the causes and consequences of arms races? Occasionally we have alluded to moral and ethical considerations as possible restraints on behavior, but that has been the extent of our discussion of ethics and morality. We have not gone to the further questions: Is morality merely a matter of beating the Communists by whatever means? What actions are moral or ethical? If a war did occur, what principles should guide our own behavior, or what principles would we want to guide the behavior of our leaders? In fact, the issue of limited war—especially limited nuclear war—not only raises questions about what can happen under various conditions, but

-135-

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The Prisoners of Insecurity: Nuclear Deterrence, the Arms Race, and Arms Control
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • The Prisoners of Insecurity - Nuclear Deterrence, the Arms Race, and Arms Control *
  • Contents v
  • Preface ix
  • 1: "Security" Policy and Insecurity 1
  • 2: Contemporary Arms and Stable Deterrence 23
  • 3: What's Wrong with Arms Races? 47
  • 4: Why Do Arms Races Occur? 69
  • 5: Conflict and Cooperation in the Arms Race 99
  • 6: Deterrence and Crisis Stability 115
  • 7: Restraints in War 135
  • 8: Arms Control in Perspective 165
  • Notes 193
  • Index 201
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