Left Intellectuals & Popular Culture in Twentieth-Century America

By Paul R. Gorman | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

I owe many debts of thanks, some long overdue, to those who have lent help and support to this project. My study began as a doctoral dissertation at the University of California, Berkeley, under Lawrence W. Levine. Larry, in his wisdom, gave me the freedom to struggle through my early, muddled ideas and then sharpened my emerging interpretation with his unmatched perspective on American culture. James N. Gregory offered excellent editorial suggestions and much-needed moral support, and Michael P. Rogin was both a font of fascinating ideas and a model of tolerance for views he does not share. A special thanks is due for Larry and Cornelia Levine's gracious hospitality in hosting our dissertation group at Berkeley. The group provided the ideal environment for a first-time author: sympathetic readers, searching critics, and fun-loving friends.

I am grateful to those who read and helped me improve my final draft. Daniel Horowitz and Roland Marchand offered many important suggestions, and Professor Horowitz's generous, careful attention to the manuscript especially honed my argument. I owe particular thanks to my friends and University of Alabama colleagues Lawrence F. Kohl and Richard B. Megraw. Larry and Rich did double duty: reading the work and providing important criticisms, and enduring the effects of the project on me (with much less criticism). Larry Kohl's artful prodding revived this project when it had begun to gather dust at Alabama, and, ultimately, his foresight helped keep me employed. Such great friends made the book possible.

I am indebted to the staff at The University of North Carolina Press for its efficiency and courtesy. I need especially to thank Executive Editor Lew Bateman for his care and attention to my work. Librarians Judith A. Schiff of Yale University and Eileen Flanagan of the Chicago Historical Society were helpful in my search for illustrations, as was the staff at the Robert F. Wagner Labor Archives, New York University.

Kathie became my wife during the last revisions of this manuscript and selflessly joined in its labor. She gave me invaluable practical help, but, most important, her caring and good humor saw the project through. I thank all my family for their patience and encouragement. My greatest debt is to my parents, Bob and Ellen Gorman, for their love, support, and wisdom. I dedicate the book to them.

-xi-

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