Left Intellectuals & Popular Culture in Twentieth-Century America

By Paul R. Gorman | Go to book overview

N0TES

INTRODUCTION
1.
The quotations are from Daniel Anderson and appear in Patrick Cooke, "TV or Not TV", In Health, December/ January 1992, p. 37. The report is D. R. Anderson and P. A. Collins, The Impact on Children's Education: Television Influence on Cognitive Development ( Washington, D.C., 1988).
2.
Ronald Edsforth, "Popular Culture and Politics in Modern America: An Introduction", in Ronald Edsforth and Larry Bennet, eds., Popular Culture and Political Change in Modern America ( Albany, N.Y., 1991), p. 3.
3.
The stories of Wertham, the Senate committee, and the delinquency crusade are developed in James Gilbert, A Cycle of Outrage: America's Reaction to the Juvenile Delinquent in the 1950s ( New York, 1986), esp. pp. 91-108, 143-61; War ren Susman , with Edward Griffin, "Did Success Spoil the United States?: Dual Representations in Postwar America", in Lary May, ed., Recasting America: Culture and Politics in the Age of the Cold War (Chicago, 1989), pp. 27-28. Eds forth , "Popular Culture and Politics", p. 3. The MLA organizing statement is quoted by Stanley Edgar Hyman, "Ideals, Dangers, and Limitations", in Nor man Jacobs , ed., Culture for the Millions? ( Princeton, 1961), p. 139. Irving Howe, A Margin of Hope ( San Diego, 1982), p. 179.
4.
The earliest use of the phrase "mass culture" I have found in English ( The Oxford English Dictionary lists a 1939 article) is in Rose Strunsky's translation of Leon Trotsky's Literature and Revolution ( New York, 1925), p. 193. It appears also in the British critic F. R. Leavis's Mass Civilization and Minority Culture ( Cambridge, 1930), p. 31; and in these American sources: "Art Is a Weapon!" (Program of the Workers Cultural Federation) New Masses 7 ( August 1931): 12; F. Cudworth Flint, review of Fiction and the Reading Public, by Q. D. Leavis ( 1932), Symposium 4 ( 1933): 502; Joshua Kunitz, "Literary Wars in the U.S.S.R.", New Masses 11 ( 12 June 1934): 16.
5.
Patrick Brantlinger, Bread and Circuses: Theories of Mass Culture as Social Decay ( Ithaca, N.Y., 1983), pp. 17-52.
6.
John Higham, "The Reorientation of American Culture in the 1890s", in John Weiss , ed., The Origins of Modern Consciousness ( Detroit, 1965), pp. 25-48; Lewis Perry, Intellectual Life in America ( New York, 1984), pp. 312-13.
7.
John Kasson, Amusing the Million: Coney Island at the Turn of the Century ( New York, 1978); Kathy Peiss, Cheap Amusements: Working Women and Leisure in Turn-of-the-Century New York ( Philadelphia, 1986); Robert Sklar, Movie-Made America ( New York, 1975), pp. 3-157; Lary May, Screening Out the Past: The Birth of Mass Culture and the Motion Picture Industry ( New York, 1980); Lewis A. Erenberg

-193-

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