The Columbia History of American Poetry

By Jay Parini; Brett C. Millier | Go to book overview
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Columbia History of American Poetry
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Introduction ix
  • Anne Bradstreet and Edward Taylor 1
  • Further Reading 14
  • Early African American Poetry 16
  • Further Reading 31
  • The Epic in the Nineteenth Century 33
  • Further Reading 63
  • Longfellow in the Aftermath of Modernism 64
  • Further Reading 96
  • The American Transcendentalist Poets 97
  • Further Reading 120
  • Emily Dickinson 121
  • Futher Reading 147
  • Walt Whitman's Revisionary Democracy 148
  • Further Reading 171
  • Edgar Allan Poe 172
  • Further Reading 202
  • Lowell, Teasdale, Wylie, Millay, and Bogan 203
  • Further Reading 231
  • Women Poets and the Emergence of Modernisn 233
  • Further Reading 259
  • Robert Frost and the Poetry of Survival 260
  • Further Reading 283
  • Ezra Pound's Imagist Aesthetics: Lustra to Mauberley 284
  • Further Reading 318
  • T. S. Eliot 319
  • Further Reading 342
  • Marianne Moore and Elizabeth Bishop 343
  • Further Reading 369
  • Wallace Stevens 370
  • Further Reading 393
  • William Carlos Williams 395
  • Further Reading 417
  • Hart Crane's Difficult Passage 419
  • Further Reading 450
  • The Poetry of the Harlem Renaissance 452
  • Further Reading 476
  • Warren, with Ransom and Tate 477
  • Further Reading 505
  • American Auden 506
  • Further Reading 532
  • The Twentieth-Century Long Poem 534
  • Further Reading 563
  • Public Music 564
  • Beat Poetry and the San Francisco Poetry Renaissance 581
  • Further Reading 604
  • John Berryman, Theodore Roethke, and the Elegy 605
  • Further Reading 630
  • What Was Confessional Poetry? 632
  • Further Reading 648
  • The Postconfessional Lyric 650
  • Further Reading 672
  • The Black Arts Poets 674
  • Further Reading 727
  • Native American Poetry 728
  • Further Reading 749
  • James Merrill and John Ashbery 750
  • Further Reading 775
  • The Visionary Poetics of Philip Levine and Charles Wright 777
  • Further Reading 806
  • Contributors 807
  • Index 811
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 894

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.