Electronic Text: Investigations in Method and Theory

By Kathryn Sutherland | Go to book overview

INDEX
abbreviations 37, 112-13
access, to 'more of everything' 8-9, 10, 60-1
accuracy of electronic texts 138
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, The ( Twain) 16, 67-96
Hemingway on 80-1
incidence of significant words 93
linkage in hypertext 80, 85-96
nodes representing communities 80, 82, 84-5
post-colonial conditions 73-4, 76-7, 78
Aldine Press145, 165
Alexandria, Library at 153, 201
Aliens film 204
Allott, Miriam49
alternatives open to reader 185-7
Altertumswissenschaft206
Althusser, Louis83
American Civil War ( 1861-5) 76
'An Approach to the Manuscripts of the Wife of Bath's Prologue' ( Robinson) 157
analysis, cladistic and database 156-8
analytical procedures 116
Ancient Mariner, The ( Coleridge) 58
Anderson, Benedict78, 79
animation, fully digitized 209
annotation
attributing sources 51-2
confusion with text 58-9
and editing process 62
expanding 48, 64n
history of 47-8
and hypertext 54-61
increased quantity of 9
justification of 62-3
and levels of fictionality 53
limitations of 55
mediation of annotator 53-4
and modern theory 51, 53
need for 49-50, 63
obscurity in text 49, 51, 53, 62
position of 57-8
power of annotator 53-4, 61
problems of annotator 48-50, 53, 61
of Shakespeare's works 178-9
annuals, nineteenth-century5, 31, 32, 33, 35
anthropology, cultural 6
Antirealism 108, 121-4
Antony and Cleopatra ( Shakespeare) 56
apparatus construction 116
apparatus of critical editions 21
archive (digital) as expanded text 173-95
archive (electronic edition) 9, 136-7
see also Folger Archive; Rossetti Archive; Shakespeare Electronic Archive
Arden edition of Shakespeare48-9, 53, 176-7, 178
As You Like It ( Shakespeare) 55
ASCII text, early editions in 191-2
Ashbee, Edward188
Association for Computational Linguistics 152
Association for Computers and the Humanities152
Association for Literary and Linguistic Computing152
audial forms of works 25-6
Augustine, St 90, 91
Austen, Jane52
authenticity 13-14
author
identity of 5, 14-15, 131
intention of 52, 131-2, 219
rights of 15
uncertainty about 60
author-function 11, 15
'axis' as value-free term 59
Bacon, Francis201, 210, 216, 218, 219
Bakhtin, Mikhail4
Bankside Shakespeare, The188-9
Barnard, John49
Barthes, Roland3-4, 5, 7, 14, 52
batch systems, early 109
Beardsley, Monroe C.52
Benjamin, Walter13
Beowulf163
Berg, Alban219
Bernhardt, Sarah173
Bertram, Paul185, 188
Bessarion, Cardinal164
'Best-Text Historical Editing' ( Robinson) 158
Bevington edition of Shakespeare178
Bhabha, Homi74, 79, 94
Bibliothèque Nationale de France148, 164

-237-

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Electronic Text: Investigations in Method and Theory
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Acknowledgements v
  • Contents vii
  • Notes on Contributors viii
  • 1- Introduction 1
  • Notes 17
  • 2- The Rationale of Hypertext 19
  • Conclusion: the Rossetti Hypermedia Archive 38
  • Notes 45
  • 3- Annotating a Text: Literary Theory And Electronic Hypertext 47
  • Notes 63
  • 4- Lighting Out for the Territory: Hypertext, Ideology, And Huckleberry Finn 67
  • Notes 96
  • Appendix Distribution of Links and Nodes In Adventures of Huckleberry Finn 103
  • 5- Out of Praxis: Three (meta)theories Of Textuality 107
  • Introduction 107
  • Conclusion 124
  • Notes 124
  • 6- The Body Encoded: Questions Of Gender and the Electronic Text 127
  • Notes 141
  • 7- New Directions in Critical Editing 145
  • Notes 165
  • 8- Digital Archive as Expanded Text: Shakespeare and Electronic Textuality 173
  • Introduction 173
  • Notes 195
  • 9- Coda: is It Morphin Time? 199
  • Notes 222
  • Select Bibliography 227
  • Index 237
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