Horace for Students of Literature: The "Ars Poetica" and Its Tradition

By O. B. Hardison Jr.; Leon Golden | Go to book overview

Second Preface

O. B. Hardison, Jr., died suddenly just after he had completed work on his commentary and notes for this book. On the model of our spirited discussions of Aristotle's Poetics several years earlier, it was his intention that we would engage in similar discussions of the works included here. His untimely death made that rewarding enterprise impossible. It was also impossible for him to make direct use of my translation in his references to the text of the Ars Poetica in the commentary. I do not think the reader will experience any serious problem because of slight variations between O.B.'s translations of Horatian passages and mine, and have decided that it is best not to make any alterations in O.B.'s text other than technical corrections.

This is O.B.'s book in design and execution. He imaginatively conceived of its scope and provided the insightful commentary. My principal task was to translate Horace's Ars Poetica and provide explanatory notes for that work. Sadly, that task has been enlarged to seeing the work through to its final publication on my own. I take on that responsibility as an act of pietas for a good and generous friend, for a brilliant scholar, and for an extraordinary teacher whose influence will be felt for generations to come.

In carrying out my responsibilities I am grateful to Professor George Kennedy for many valuable suggestions that have improved the text. I also thank George and Bobby Harper, close friends of O.B. Hardison and of mine for many years, for their important assistance in proof‐ reading the original manuscript. In closing, I would like to express my gratitude to Matthew Hardison for his valuable assistance in locating and copying on disk the text of his father's manuscript.

Leon Golden

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Horace for Students of Literature: The "Ars Poetica" and Its Tradition
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Horace for Students of Literature - The "Ars Poetica" and Its Tradition *
  • Contents *
  • Preface *
  • Second Preface *
  • General Introduction *
  • I- Ars Poetica by Horace *
  • Introduction *
  • Ars Poetica - Translated by Leon Golden *
  • Life and Work of Horace *
  • Commentary *
  • II- Poetria Nova by Geoffrey of Vinsauf *
  • Introduction *
  • Poetria Nova - Translated by Margaret F. Nims *
  • Commentary *
  • III- L''Art Poétique by Nicolas Boileau-Despréaux *
  • Introduction and Commentary *
  • L''Art Poétique - Translated by Sir William Soames (revised by John Dryden) *
  • IV- An Essay on Criticism by Alexander Pope *
  • Introduction and Commentary *
  • An Essay on Criticism *
  • New Standards *
  • V- English Bards and Scotch Reviewers and Hints from Horace by Lord Byron *
  • Introduction and Commentary *
  • English Bards and Scotch Reviewers *
  • Hints from Horace *
  • The Kantian Revolution *
  • VI- Notes toward a Supreme Fiction by Wallace Stevens *
  • Introduction and Commentary *
  • Notes toward a Supreme Fiction *
  • Notes *
  • Bibliography *
  • General Index *
  • Index of Foreign Terms *
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 395

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.