Who Makes Public Policy?: The Struggle for Control between Congress and the Executive

By Robert S. Gilmour; Alexis A. Halley et al. | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

In a book with eight authors, a complete list of acknowledgments would be unduly long. As the editors, we thank our coauthors for their major contributions in developing the framework of this study as well as the individual cases. Their drive to probe the nature and results of congressional intervention in program implementation, their willingness to use the case-analysis approach, and their investment of energy and commitment over a period of three years made this effort possible.

The case-study research owes much to the initiative and leadership of the National Academy of Public Administration's Panel on Congress and the Executive and its Project Advisory Board. James R. Jones, chairman and chief executive officer of the American Stock Exchange, and former member of Congress, provided intellectual and organizational leadership in framing the overall Academy study and guiding it to conclusion. Ray Kline, president of the Academy during the study, supported its initiation and provided counsel, encouragement, and critical questions at key junctures throughout the research process. R. Scott Fosler, current president of the Academy, urged separate, scholarly publication of the case studies that now appear in this volume.

Panel members and their advisers participated in the selection of the cases and provided counsel on the reporting of the findings and interpretation of results. The panel members and their advisers included Thomas H. Boggs, Jr., Richard Boiling (deceased), Alan S. Boyd, Hale Champion, Roger Davidson, Martha Derthick, John N. Erlenborn, Joseph L. Fisher (deceased), Alton Frye, Harry S. Havens, Matthew Holden, Frank Horton, Melvin R. Laird, Howard Messner, Terry Sanford, Allen Schick, James Sundquist, Alair Townsend, Richard Wegman, and Joseph R. Wright, Jr.

During preparation of the ten cases presented here, the authors interviewed well over three hundred officials, former officials, and close observers who were actively involved in or who had important perspectives on policy and administrative aspects of relevant issues as they unfolded. These

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