Who Makes Public Policy?: The Struggle for Control between Congress and the Executive

By Robert S. Gilmour; Alexis A. Halley et al. | Go to book overview

4
"Not in My Back Yard": High-Level
Nuclear Waste Policy

JAMES A. THURBER


Background and Overview

The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (NWPA) (P.L. 97-425) and the subsequent Nuclear Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1987 (NWPAA) (Title V of P.L. 100-203 and P.L. 100-507) provide the legislative framework for the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) program to find a long-term means for storing high‐ level civilian nuclear waste in the United States.

In 1987 Congress directed the DOE through the NWPAA to study ("characterize") the Yucca Mountain, Nevada, site for suitability as a national nuclear waste geologic repository, while at the same time prohibiting the search for a second repository site. The selection of Yucca Mountain was the geographic expression of congressional agendas that reflected the power structure within Congress and well-entrenched political-economic relationships in the nuclear power arena.

The passage of the NWPAA was a direct result of the policy adopted in the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982. The NWPA had enjoined the Department of Energy to hold hearings wherever site characterization studies were conducted in order to identify the public's concerns and calm citizens in affected areas by educating them about the repository site selection process. DOE, politically weak and convinced that public liaison was unnecessary and irrelevant, only halfheartedly attempted to implement the public comment portion of the 1982, policy. As the program neared collapse in 1987, Congress reacted with new legislation—the NWPA Amendments.

This case shows that decision-making processes concerning the disposal of high-level civilian nuclear waste evolved through several policy-making subsystems. From 1956 until 1979, the subsystem was dominant, exhibiting stable relations among a small group of decision makers. After the Three

-62-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Who Makes Public Policy?: The Struggle for Control between Congress and the Executive
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 390

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.