The Better Part of Valor: More, Erasmus, Colet, and Vives, on Humanism, War, and Peace, 1496-1535

By Robert P. Adams | Go to book overview

PREFACE

The author hopes that The Better Part of Valor will interest both educated readers and students of the English Renaissance—in a word, many who care for a good life. As a study of men and ideas this essay seeks to present, in its entirety, the thought of the greatest early Tudor humanists on war and peace. Life and literature are therefore presented in vigorous interaction.

Completion of this work would have been impossible without sustained encouragement, criticism, and aid. For their friendly thoroughness in criticism of the manuscript at various stages in its growth I am particularly indebted to Professor Douglas Bush of Harvard University, to Professor Emeritus William Haller, of Barnard College in Columbia University, and to Dr. Louis B. Wright, Director of the Folger Shakespeare Library. As those who have sojourned at the Folger Library are well aware, Dr. Wright is a tower of friendly support to toilers in the Renaissance vineyards. Professor Gerald E. Bentley of Princeton University has given support when it was most needed. In addition I am grateful to the Trustees and Director of the Folger Library for several fellowships and grants in aid of research. The American Philosophical Society has generously assisted the progress of the work, as has the University of Washington.

In the interest of heightened readability quotations included in the text have been put into modern spelling. In order to reduce the number of notes but still keep sources clear, abbreviated references have often been placed inside parentheses within the narrative body of the text itself. A list of all abbreviations thus used appears before the text.

Warm thanks are due to the staffs of many libraries: to the Folger Shakespeare Library and in particular to Miss Dorothy Mason; to the Newberry Library and to its rare-book librarian, Mrs. Gertrude Woodward; to the University of Chicago Library; the University of Michigan

-vii-

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