Reforming Sex: The German Movement for Birth Control and Abortion Reform, 1920-1950

By Atina Grossmann | Go to book overview

— five —
Forbidden Love

Sex Reform and the Crisis
of the Republic, 1931 to 1933

We have emergency decrees in the purest sense of the word, for they decree a social emergency and escalate the state of emergency that already exists.

CLARA ZETKIN,

in her final address to the Reichstag
on August 30, 1932I

The abortion campaign wound down as the Weimar Republic lurched toward its chaotic final year. Weakened by spiraling unemployment and the bitter divisions between Communists and Social Democrats, the working-class movement with which sex reform was so tightly linked fragmented further, even as some urban neighborhoods settled into a state of virtual civil war between Nazis and Communists. 2 The social welfare institutions, which were the focus of so much sex reform effort and ire, unraveled while trying to cope with mounting social and economic tensions. Paradoxically, the breakdown of traditional working-class and family structures and the extreme precariousness of the Weimar welfare state created space for radical innovation by the left and sex reform, especially in the "sexual struggles" of youth and women. Conventional politics seemed increasingly out of control as the republic endured no fewer than five major electoral campaigns in 1932. A divided and angry left saw the Nazis exploit a virtually unbroken stream of public exposure and activity.

Yet Berlin became even more "red." With the Social Democrats firmly ensconsed in the Prussian state government (until the July 1932 Papen coup), the Communists were the strongest party in the capital. In the last Weimar election in November 1932, nearly one-third of the Berlin electorate voted Communist, and the KPD gained a majority in nine proletarian districts that were also centers of sex reform activity (Wedding, Friedrichshain, Neukölln,

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Reforming Sex: The German Movement for Birth Control and Abortion Reform, 1920-1950
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 304

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.