The Preacher King: Martin Luther King, Jr. and the Word That Moved America

By Richard Lischer | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

During his brief career Martin Luther King, Jr. criss-crossed the nation many times, leaving a trail of sermons and vivid memories in the hearts of those who heard him. Over the past few years it has been my pleasure to follow the trail. The two major repositories for King materials are the Martin Luther King, Jr. Center for Nonviolent Social Change in Atlanta and the Mugar Memorial Library of Boston University. Serious students of King all over the world are indebted to the leadership of the King Center for making available a significant portion of his sermons and speeches. Louise Cook and Diane Ware were especially helpful to me at the King Center, and Howard Gotlieb and Margaret Goostray provided the materials I needed in the Special Collections Section of the Mugar Library at Boston. In Washington, Elinor DesVerney Sinnette, Karen Jefferson, and Esme Bhan guided me through the Ralph J. Bunche Oral History Collection in the Moorland-Spingarn Research Center of Howard University. While I was working in Washington, my colleague Roland Murphy, O.Carm., put me up in his monastery and offered good Carmelite hospitality. Marvin Whiting, Archivist and Curator of Manuscripts in the Birmingham Public Library, provided access to the tapes of the mass‐ meeting speeches held in Selma and to the Eugene "Bull" Connor Papers containing reports and verbatims of the nightly meetings held in Birmingham.

I am also grateful to the staffs of the Howard Divinity School Tape Recording Collection, the Duke Divinity School Media Center, and the Reigner Recording Library of Union Theological Seminary, Richmond. Dean Lawrence E. Carter of the Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial Chapel at Morehouse College offered assistance when I turned to him. In the Duke Divinity School Library, I received valuable help from Harriet Leonard and Tom Clark. Relatively late in my research I made contact

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The Preacher King: Martin Luther King, Jr. and the Word That Moved America
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • The Preacher King - Martin Luther King, Jr. and the Word That Moved America *
  • Preface *
  • Acknowledgments *
  • Contents *
  • Prologue *
  • I- Preparation *
  • 1- Surrounded *
  • 2- Apprenticed to the Word *
  • 3- Dexter Avenue and "The Daybreak of Freedom" *
  • II- Performance *
  • 4- What He Received *
  • 5- The Strategies of Style *
  • 6- From Identification to Rage *
  • 7- The Masks of Character *
  • III- Theology and beyond *
  • 8- In the Mirror of the Bible *
  • 9- The Ebenezer Gospel *
  • 10- Bearing "The Gospel of Freedom" *
  • Epilogue *
  • Notes *
  • Bibliography *
  • Index *
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