In Her Own Right: The Life of Elizabeth Cady Stanton

By Elisabeth Griffith | Go to book overview

4
Seneca Falls Sentiments
1848

The connection between Seneca Falls and Elizabeth Cady Stanton's independence is compelling. The combination of circumstances that followed her move to upstate New York converted her from high-minded housewife to feminist agitator. Discontented with the conditions of isolated housekeeping and encouraged by Lucretia Mott, Mrs. Stanton took action at last. In initiating and organizing what came to be known as the Seneca Falls Women's Rights Convention of 1848, Mrs. Stanton dared to try out in public the roles of feminist and reformer that she had privately admired.

Prior to 1848 Stanton had been observing and practicing different roles. The experiences of her privileged childhood, the expectations and rejections of her parents, her unusual education and extensive reading, the influence of male mentors, her exposure to revival and reform, her marriage to a political abolitionist, her introduction to female reformers, her friendship with Lucretia Mott, her grappling with patriarchy in religion and society, had all been factors in her development. Each episode allowed her to observe different behaviors and their results. Each observation enabled her to accept, reject, or modify various roles.

It must have been harder for her to anticipate what reactions some roles would evoke. In her experience female reformers had been ridiculed, condemned, disdained, ignored, and dismissed as ineffective. Yet the women themselves persevered and took pride in their contributions. Criticized by people Stanton no longer respected, these women were applauded by those she admired and by each other. The women themselves seemed to thrive, managing to combine public pursuits with more traditional occupations. They did not disintegrate under pressure. The high regard Stanton felt for

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
In Her Own Right: The Life of Elizabeth Cady Stanton
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 268

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.