British Women Poets, 1660-1800: An Anthology

By Joyce Fullard | Go to book overview

Biography
Adam [Adams], Jean ( 1710-1765) is known to have been born at Greenock, a small port on the Clyde. She received some education at a parish school, but after her father's death she entered the service of a clergyman as a governess and maid. Allowed use of her employer's library, she read extensively and began to write. Her Miscellany Poems were published in 1734 as by Mrs. Jane Adams, and sometime after this she left domestic service and opened a girls' school. After some years the school failed and Adam, already noted for her eccentricity, became a wandering vagrant, possibly hawking goods when she could buy stock. In April 1765 she died one day after being admitted to the Glasgow poorhouse as "a poor woman in distress, a stranger who had been wandering about."
Airy, Harriot (fl. 1759). Nothing is known about this writer except that she lived in Worcestershire in 1759 when three of her poems were published in The Gentleman's Magazine. These poems are: "To My Garden" (June), "An Address to My Pen" (September), and "Ode to Truth" (November). The BLC lists two copies of Memoirs of a Coquet; or, The history of Miss Harriot Airy. By the author of " Emily Willis," etc. London: W. Haggard for Francis Noble and John Noble, 1765.
Baillie, Joanna ( 1762-1851) was the daughter of Dr. James Baillie and Dorothea Hunter, sister of the famous Dr. John Hunter of London. Dr. Baillie died in 1778, soon after being appointed Professor of Divinity at the University of Glasgow, and in 1783 the family moved to London. Joanna published a volume of poems anonymously in 1790. This received little notice, but her next publication, in 1798, created a sensation in literary circles. The volume, which included two tragedies and one comedy, had the unwieldy title, A Series of Plays; in Which it is Attempted to Delineate the Stronger Passions of the Mind; Each Passion Being the Subject of a Tragedy and a Comedy. In a long introductory essay Baillie criticized earlier playwrights for deviating from nature in dramatic characterization, discussed her own

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British Women Poets, 1660-1800: An Anthology
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • British Women Poets 1660-1800- An Anthology *
  • Contents *
  • Acknowledgements *
  • List of Plates *
  • Introduction *
  • I- Writing and Writers *
  • II- Friendship *
  • III- Love, Courtship and Marriage *
  • IV- Home and Children *
  • V- Places *
  • VI- Nature *
  • VII- Society *
  • VIII- Patriotism and War *
  • IX- Religion *
  • X- Miscellaneous Verse *
  • Notes to I Writing and Writers *
  • Notes to III Love, Courtship and Marriage 486
  • Notes to IV Home and Children 495
  • Notes to V Places 503
  • Notes to VI Nature 514
  • Notes to VII Society 519
  • Notes to VIII Patriotism and War 536
  • Notes to IX Religion 541
  • Biography *
  • Appendix Pseudonyms Used by Authors, Their Friends, or Their Correspondents *
  • Bibliography *
  • List of Authors with Titles of Poems *
  • First Line Index *
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