British Women Poets, 1660-1800: An Anthology

By Joyce Fullard | Go to book overview

First Line Index
A Wit, transported with inditing, 285
Again the smoothly circling year, 257
Ah, gaze not on those eyes! forbear, 119
Ah Love! ere yet I knew thy fatal power, 139
Ah! once to purest, unpolluted fame, 264
Ah what avails the rose's bloom, 54
Ah! why will mem'ry with officious care, 263
Airy spirits, you who love, 269
Alas, how hard a thing, 387
Alas! my purse! how lean and low! 432
All-bounteous heav'n, Castalio cries, 299
All hail, my dear, my native plain! 185
All hail! thou pleasing, cheerful morn, 241
All wrapt in thought, Aurelia lay, 112
Altho' from thee I soon must part, 141
An oak, with spreading branches crown'd, 297
An outcast from my native home, 356
And are ye sure the news is true? 157
And now the school approaching near, 216
And ye shall walk in silk attire, 132
Arise, my soul, to Jesus fly, 416
As at their work two weavers sat, 420
As birds to hatch their young do sit in spring, 16
As musing pensive in my silent home, 276
As to Aeneas, when he went, 423
As wretched, vain, and indiscreet, 98
Ascend, my soul, and elevate thy thought, 405
Ask me no more my truth to prove, 125
Assist my doubtful muse, propitious Love, 389
At dewy dawn, 116
At easy distance from the town, 199
Base sordid fop, to love to make pretence, 112
Beauty complete, and majesty divine, 397
Begin the high celestial strain, 395
Behold a world of rebels rise, 411
Beneath an infant sleeping lies; 163
Bonnie Charlie's now awa', 371
Bring the song, and join in chorus; 457
Britain with Greece and Rome contended long, 40
By commerce, Albion, and by arms refin'd, 219
By custom doom'd to folly, sloth and ease, 303
By this fountain's flow'ry side, 260
Caesar! renown'd in science as in war, 210
Cease, Damon, cease, I'll hear no more; 116
Cease, prithee, Muse, thus to infest, 29

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British Women Poets, 1660-1800: An Anthology
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • British Women Poets 1660-1800- An Anthology *
  • Contents *
  • Acknowledgements *
  • List of Plates *
  • Introduction *
  • I- Writing and Writers *
  • II- Friendship *
  • III- Love, Courtship and Marriage *
  • IV- Home and Children *
  • V- Places *
  • VI- Nature *
  • VII- Society *
  • VIII- Patriotism and War *
  • IX- Religion *
  • X- Miscellaneous Verse *
  • Notes to I Writing and Writers *
  • Notes to III Love, Courtship and Marriage 486
  • Notes to IV Home and Children 495
  • Notes to V Places 503
  • Notes to VI Nature 514
  • Notes to VII Society 519
  • Notes to VIII Patriotism and War 536
  • Notes to IX Religion 541
  • Biography *
  • Appendix Pseudonyms Used by Authors, Their Friends, or Their Correspondents *
  • Bibliography *
  • List of Authors with Titles of Poems *
  • First Line Index *
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