Thurgood Marshall: His Speeches, Writings, Arguments, Opinions, and Reminiscences

By Thurgood Marshall; Mark V. Tushnet | Go to book overview

PART II
WRITINGS AND SPEECHES
AS A LAWYER

Marshall wrote several articles while he headed the Legal Defense Fund, and gave many speeches, only a few of which were transcribed. The articles and speeches were generally aimed at educating the audience about the NAACP's legal challenges to segregation, recent Supreme Court decisions, and related matters. Audiences varied, but Marshall directed most of his talks and articles at nonspecialists. The articles published in the NAACP's official magazine The Crisis were, of course, directed at the NAACP's membership. The Journal of Negro Education, published at Howard University, was an important resource for African American professionals, particularly (but not exclusively) teachers and educators. The articles and speeches conveyed information, but they also were designed to rally support for the NAACP's efforts.

Marshall was primarily a trial and appellate lawyer, not an academic writer or publicist. He educated the public more through his work in the courtroom and in informal comments after losing or (more often) winning important cases. The early articles are particularly dry, providing summaries of court cases, but others report on Marshall's investigations and the NAACP's wartime concerns. Only a few (such as selection 11, a journalistic account of Marshall's investigation of court-martial proceedings against African American soldiers during the Korean War) convey some flashes of the eloquence and wit Marshall brought to his courtroom performance. The articles are significant documents even so, because taken as a group they give a reasonably good overview

-67-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Thurgood Marshall: His Speeches, Writings, Arguments, Opinions, and Reminiscences
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Thurgood Marshall - His Speeches, Writings, Arguments, Opinions, and Reminiscences *
  • Contents *
  • Foreword ix
  • Introduction xviii
  • Part I Legal Briefs and Oral Arguments 1
  • Part II Writings and Speeches as a Lawyer 67
  • Part III Writings as a Judge 171
  • Part IV Judicial Opinions 303
  • Part V Reminiscences 411
  • Selected Bibliography 515
  • Appendix: Annotated List of Important Decisions 517
  • Permissions Acknowledgments 536
  • Index 539
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 548

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.