Our Fiery Trial: Abraham Lincoln, John Brown, and the Civil War Era

By Stephen B. Oates | Go to book overview

THREE
JOHN BROWN AND HIS JUDGES

I

Americans have always found it difficult to write fairly about controversial figures in their past, and this has been especially true of John Brown. Since he died on the gallows for attacking Harpers Ferry, those who have dealt with him—biographers, poets, novelists, essayists, and, alas, professional historians—have with rare exception been either passionately for or against the man. Either Brown was right or he was wrong. Either he was an authentic and immortal hero who sacrificed his life so that America's "poor, despised Africans" might be free, or he was a "mean, terrible, vicious man," a demented horse thief, a murderer, a psychopath. For over one hundred years, American writers—popular and scholarly alike— have engaged in such heated controversy over whether Brown was right or wrong, sane or crazy, hero or fanatic, that scarcely anyone has taken the time to try to understand him.

The legend of Brown as hero emerged from a succession of worshipful biographies published between 1860 and 1910. Those written by James Redpath, Franklin B. Sanborn, and Richard J. Hinton —all of whom had been friends and associates of Brown—portrayed him as a deeply principled "Puritan soldier," "an idealist with a human intent," "a simple, brave, heroic person, incapable of anything selfish or base." The legend-builders did not always agree on facts. Redpath, the propagandist of the Brown legend, asserted that the Old Hero did not commit the Pottawatomie murders in Kansas, that he was somewhere else when they occurred. Sanborn, followed by Hinton, gave evidence that Brown had instigated the massacre, but argued that he was justified in

-22-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Our Fiery Trial: Abraham Lincoln, John Brown, and the Civil War Era
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • One Styron's War Against the Blacks 1
  • Two God's Stone in the Pool of Slavery 9
  • Three John Brown and His Judges 22
  • Four Modern Radicals and John Brown 43
  • Five the Enigma of Stephen A. Douglas 52
  • Six Lincoln's Journey to Emancipation 61
  • Seven the Long Shadow of Lincoln 86
  • Eight Carl Sandburg's Lincoln 99
  • Nine Ghost Riders in the Sky 112
  • Ten Themes and Variations of a Civil War Trilogy 121
  • References 130
  • Index 144
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 150

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.