NAFTA in Transition

By Stephen J. Randall; Herman W. Konrad | Go to book overview

Pedro G. Marquez Perez Department of Political Science University of Calgary


4
The Social Neo-Liberal Policies of
Carlos Salinas de Gortari

The reforms achieved during the administrations of Miguel de la Madrid ( 1982-1988) and Carlos Salinas de Gortari ( 1988-1994) ignited a debate concerning the political and economic processes of the reform and the nature of Mexican development policy. Taking into account the world systems shift with the end of the Cold War, the debate questioned the relevance and viability of a statist regime in the context of a trend toward economic globalization and the development of regional trade blocs. Mexican reforms in these years focused on several concerns: the necessity of creating new political spaces for those groups previously excluded from political participation; the necessity to design a new development policy that could solve the crisis produced by the old model based on "import substitution" under "captive markets," which had characterized the development orientation of the country for several decades and which had left the nation with insufficient investment, high public debts and deepening poverty in the country;1 and the need to reconsider Mexico's relationship to outside markets through the establishment of more efficent production and more consistent and higher standards. The de la Madrid and Salinas governments presented such reforms in terms of continued adherence to the ideals and goals of the Revolution, including individualism, while the role of the state and the bureaucracy especially were transformed.2

____________________
1
Juan Rebolledo, La Reform del Estado En México ( México: Fondo de Cultura Económica, 1993), p. 17.
2
Carlos Salinas de Gortari, "Reformando del Estado", Nexus Magazine, 148 ( April 1990), p. 32.

-47-

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