NAFTA in Transition

By Stephen J. Randall; Herman W. Konrad | Go to book overview

Morton Weinfeld Department of Sociology McGill University


14
North American Integration and the Issue
of Immigration: Canadian Perspectives

INTRODUCTION

Debate continues about the likely implications for the signing parties of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA).1 The parameters of most of these debates have been economic. But some observers report initial discussions—among academics rather than policy makers—of the idea of greater continental integration, moving beyond free trade.2

This paper explores the idea of continental integration from a Canadian perspective, with an emphasis on immigration. Such future integration could include freer (but not unrestricted) movement not only of goods, capital, and ideas, but of people. The integration would follow the model of the European Community in which freedom of movement is seen as a fundamental social right of workers from member states. NAFTA is just one instrument which will operate in a context where major external population pressures face Europe, Canada, Australia, and the United States, with a need for global responses.

____________________
1
Michael Hart, A North American Free Trade Agreement:The Strategic Implications for Canada ( Ottawa: Institute for Research on Public Policy, 1990); Richard Lipsey , Canada at the U.S.-Mexico Free Trade Dance:Wallflower or Partner? ( Toronto: C.D. Howe Institute, August 1990); Ronald J. Wonnacott, U.S. Huband-spoke Bilaterals and the Multilateral Trading System ( Toronto: C.D. Howe Institute, October 1990); Richard Rothstein, "Continental Drift:"NAFTA and its Aftershock, American Prospect, 12 ( Winter 1993), pp. 68-84; Dolores Acevedo and Thomas J. Espenshade, "Implications of a North American Free Trade Agreeement for Mexican Migration into the United States", Population and Development Review, 18, No. 4 ( 1992), pp. 729-44.
2
Sylvia Ostry and Lawrence Taylor, remarks delivered at Facing North/Facing South Conference, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, 3 May 1991.

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