The Course of American Democratic Thought

By Ralph Henry Gabriel; Robert H. Walker | Go to book overview

BIBLIOGRAPHY

THE GREAT AND RAPIDLY GROWING literature dealing with ideas and their history in America cannot be described or even listed in a bibliography of appropriate length for the present volume. The following bibliography is intended for readers who may wish to push further in certain areas or subjects or who desire to explore points of view that differ from those expressed in the present work.


GENERAL

The pioneer study is V. L. Parrington, Main Currents in American Thought, 3 vols. ( N.Y., 1927). Brilliant and provocative, American history interpreted with a Jeffersonian bias. The third volume (dealing with the post-Civil War period) is a collection of chapters and fragments left when Parrington died. Oscar Cargill, Intellectual America ( N.Y., 1941), emphasizes literature and the migrations of ideas from Europe. Alfred Kazin, On Native Grounds ( N.Y., 1942), contains a critical account of the American literature in the 20th century. Charles A. and Mary R. Beard, The American Spirit ( N.Y., 1942), traces American intellectual history by means of single theme, the idea of civilization, and expresses a challenging humanistic "world view." Merle Curti, The Growth of American Thought ( N.Y., 1943), covers the entire chronological story and relates ideas to the social matrix in which they function--an indispensible work. Van Wyck Brooks, Makers and Finders: a History of the Writers in America, 1800-1915 ( N.Y., 1936-1952). A major work in many volumes that deals with greater and lesser writers and with the intellectual climates of which they were a part. H. S. Commager, The American Mind ( New Haven, 1950), opens with an interpretive chapter on the final decades of the nineteenth century and deals with all important aspects of thought in the twentieth. R. C. Spiller and others, Literary History of the United States, 3 vols. ( N.Y., 1948). A cooperative history with chapters on individual writers and particular periods. Volume III contains complete bibliographies of writers. M. G. White, Social Thought in America

-541-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Course of American Democratic Thought
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 572

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.