She Stoops to Conquer

By Oliver Goldsmith; C. Moore Smith | Go to book overview

off in a post-coach, and the young squire went on horseback. They're thirty miles off by this time.

Hast. Then all my hopes are over!

Serv. Yes, Sir. Old Sir Charles is arrived. He and the old gentleman of the house have been laughing at Mr. Marlow's mistakes this half hour. They are coming this way. [Exit.

Hast. Then I must not be seen. So now to my fruitless appointment at the bottom of the garden. This is about the time. [Exit.

Enter Sir CHARLES MARLOWand HARDCASTLE.

Hard. Ha! ha! ha! The peremptory tone in which he sent forth his sublime commands.

Sir Chas. And the reserve with which I suppose he treated all your advances.

Hard. And yet he might have seen something in me above a common inn- keeper, too.

Sir Chas. Yes, Dick, but he mistook you for an uncommon inn-keeper; ha! ha ha!

Hard. Well, I'm in too good spirits to think of anything but joy. Yes, my dear friends, this union of our families will make our personal friendships hereditary; and though my daughter's fortune is but small----

Sir Chas. Why, Dick, will you talk of fortune to me? My son is possessed of more than a competence already, and can want nothing but a good and virtuous girl

-104-

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She Stoops to Conquer
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • [dedication] to Samuel Johnson, Ll.D. 5
  • Dramatis Personæ. - [the Cast of the Characters at Covent Garden in 1773.] 7
  • Prologue. 8
  • Act I 9
  • Act II 30
  • Act III 64
  • Act IV 82
  • Act V 104
  • Epilogue. 125
  • Epilogue, 127
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