International Review of Sign Linguistics - Vol. 1

By William H. Edmondson; Ronnie B. Wilbur | Go to book overview

Chapter 3 Function and Medium in the Forms of Linguistic Expression Found in a Sign Language

Trevor Johnston University of Sydney

Investigations of sign languages of the deaf have established that languages in the visual--gestural medium exist ( Deuchar, 1984; Klima et al., 1979; Markowicz, 1980). The research on sign languages, particularly American Sign Language (ASL), has concentrated on showing the similarity of linguistic patterning in sign and spoken languages. Sign languages satisfy general structural and functional criteria thought to define human language--displaying arbitrariness, duality, and discreteness in structure, and fulfilling communicative, expressive, and phatic functions--even though some of these criteria (e.g., arbitrariness) are less absolute and clear-cut as defining characteristics of spoken languages than was once believed (cf. Hockett, 1960; Lyons, 1981). Research has established the existence of sign phonology and morphosyntax, with the latter particularly rooted in movement, direction, and spatial location, and has described their manifestation in language processing and cases of brain trauma. In terms of processing, visual--gestural language has been shown to be differentially processed by the left and right hemispheres of the brain in ways predicted by, and parallel to, the processing of auditory--oral language, and differently from other visual, nonlinguistic input ( Poimer, Klima, & Bellugi, 1987). Moreover, the pattern of language acquisition in sign has been shown to be similar to that in speech (e.g., Bonvillian, Orlansky, & Novack, 1983; Hofftneister & Wilbur, 1980). Although linguistic research into the sign languages of established deaf communities has shown them to be natural languages with patterns of language use and cultural identity similar to that of speaking communities, there still is much that is not known about the characterization of these languages and, in particular, their relationships with their host spoken languages.

-57-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
International Review of Sign Linguistics - Vol. 1
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 274

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.