Shaping the Eighteenth Amendment: Temperance Reform, Legal Culture, and the Polity, 1880-1920

By Richard F. Hamm | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

This book was a long time in the making. It began many years ago as a conversation with Charles W. McCurdy. Early in 1980 he mentioned as a paper topic the effect of interstate commerce doctrines on the prohibition movement. Since then the work has grown. It has put down roots in various literatures, sprawled across far larger periods of time, blossomed with unexpected fruits, and required more tending and effort than this historical gardener would ever have imagined. Along the way I have accumulated many debts that must be acknowledged.

The greatest debts are those I owe to my family. Without their intellectual, moral, and financial support this work would never have begun, let alone been completed. At various times I lived with family members while researching or writing this work, and they all endured my stays with good cheer. Elaine Cascio sustained me more than I can ever say. She read various versions two or three times, proving that love has great patience. Her sharp editorial eye and common sense has made this a better book.

Also this work has benefited from a number of suggestions from various people coerced into reading it. At different times both Phil Merkel and Denise Thompson read the entire manuscript with pen in hand and removed hundreds of convoluted constructions. Richard Fiesta and Candice Bredbenner pointed me to literatures and interpretations that enriched the work. Christopher Lee, Jean Lee, and Robert Stanley made suggestions about issues that proved especially useful in rethinking the work at a particularly critical stage. Christine Paquette suggested a number of changes that improved both the introduction and conclusion. Reid Mitchell performed a feat that few will equal: he read the work twice, each time making comments that bettered the book. William Harbaugh's observations aided the development of this work in its earliest stages. Joseph Kett, Edward Ayers, and Calvin Woodard closely read the manuscript and suggested paths to follow in making it into a book. Stanley Katz, Robert Wesser, and Lewis Bateman expressed strong faith in the project, keeping me on track during the vagaries of the publishing process. The far-reaching, lengthy, and constructive criticisms of the anonymous

-ix-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Shaping the Eighteenth Amendment: Temperance Reform, Legal Culture, and the Polity, 1880-1920
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 341

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.