The Book of the Popes (Liber Pontificalis) - Vol. 1

By Louise Ropes Loomis | Go to book overview

I. PETER
Blessed Peter,1 the Antiochene,
son of John, of the province
of Galilee and the town of
Bethsaida, brother of Andrew
and chief of the apostles,
Blessed Peter, the apostle, and
chief of the apostles, the Antio-
chene, son of John, of the
province of Galilee and the
town of Bethsaida, brother of
Andrew,
first occupied the seat of the bishop in Anthiocia2 for 7 years. This Peter entered the city of Rome when Nero was Cæsar and there occupied the seat of the bishop for 25 years,
1 month and 8 days2 months and 3 days.

He was bishop in the time of Tiberius Cæsar and of Gaius and of Tiberius Claudius and of Nero.3

He wrote two epistles which are called catholic, and the gospel of Mark, for Mark was his disciple and son by baptism; afterwards the whole source of the four gospels, which were confirmed by inquiring of him, that is Peter, and obtaining his testimony; although one gospel is couched in Greek, another in Hebrew, another in Latin, yet by his testimony were they all confirmed.4

____________________
1
As explained above in the Introduction (p. xii), when different versions of the narrative are found in the different epitomes or recensions of the Liber Pontificalis , the readings are set down, as here, in parallel columns, the older text being given first. Most of the following story of the life of the apostle is taken by the author of the Lib. Pont. from Jerome De Viris Illustribus, c. 1 (ed. Richardson, pp. 6 and 7; Texte und Untersuchungen zur Gesch. der altchristlichen Literatur, vol. XIV). An excellent little hand book to consult for information on Jerome and the other church fathers who will be cited in the course of our text and notes is Bardenhewer Patrology, translated by Strahan.
2
Antioch, the ancient Antiochia. Corrupt or peculiar forms of proper names in the Latin text will be reproduced in the translation.
3
Our author gives two incompatible traditions, the first that Peter did not come to Rome before the reign of Nero (cf. the late second centuryActa Petri et Pauli in Tischendorf, Acta Apostolorum Apocrypha, p. 1, etc.), the second that after a pontificate of twenty-five years at Rome he was put to death under Nero. The latter is Jerome's version. The reader may find a discussion of the Petrine problem, with many further references, in the volume of this series devoted to the history of the Papacy.
4
Duchesne suggests that the idea that the four gospels all issued from a single source was derived from the apsidal mosaics of fifth and sixth century churches which represented the four rivers of paradise all flowing out from one head. Lib. Pont., vol. I, p. 119, n. 7.

-4-

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The Book of the Popes (Liber Pontificalis) - Vol. 1
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Records of Civilization Sources and Studies i
  • Records of Civilization Sources and Studies ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Chronological List of Popes vii
  • Introduction ix
  • Preface 3
  • I. Peter 4
  • Iii. Cletus 7
  • V. Anencletus 9
  • Xxx. Marcellinus (296-304) 36
  • Xlix. Simplicius (468-483) 105
  • Liv. Hormisdas (514-523) 124
  • Lvii. Boniface II (530-532) 140
  • Lxi. Vigilius (537-555) 146
  • Lxiii. John III (561-574) 163
  • Lxiv. Benedict I (575-579) 166
  • Lxv. Pelagius II (579-590) 167
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