1. The Problem of the South

THE SQUALID SOUTH

Problem 1, Section 1

"We of the North have been too long deceived by the surface charm of the South, by the sincere friendliness and hospitality of the Southern people, which is a thin crust over the treacherous economic and social quicksand that engulfs the mass of the Southern population," newsman Leeds Moberly has written.

"The condition of too many people in the South is deplorable, degrading, destructive of the decencies which men expect from American civilization," replied the Raleigh ( N.C.) News and Observer. "But history shows and God knows that not all the blame for that condition is Southern... There are bad men in the South, blind men, ruthless men, greedy men. But the South has no monopoly on them."

It so happens that there is truth in both of the foregoing observations. The South is a quagmire which threatens to engulf the entire nation, but much of the responsibility for the South's sad condition lies outside the region. At the same time there is no denying that the South is hypersensitive to criticism which emanates from the outside, and professional Defenders-of-the- South never fail to take advantage of every opportunity to aggravate this unfortunate psychopathic condition. The South's paranoia dates from its "whupping" in the Civil War and has not improved much since.

Typically symptomatic of this was the reaction which followed the remark by Frances Perkins (while she was Secretary of Labor) that "A social revolution would take place if shoes were put on the people of the South."

-1-

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Southern Exposure
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iv
  • Contents xi
  • 1. the Problem of the South 1
  • The Squalid South 1
  • The New Order of Slavocracy 19
  • The Perversion of Populism 37
  • Freedom Road--Closed 48
  • Last Hired, First Fired 63
  • Book Larnin', in Black and White 68
  • White Man's Country 78
  • The 7.7 Democracy of the South 92
  • 2. All's Hell on the Southern Front 127
  • The Southern Revolt 127
  • The Visible Empire 162
  • Kingfish and Small Fry 187
  • 3. the Road Ahead 264
  • Whose Good Earth? 275
  • Tva Leads the Way 282
  • The South Joins the Unions 288
  • Brotherhood--Union Made 302
  • Fair Employment Forever! 315
  • The Race Racket 326
  • Total Equality, and How to Get It 341
  • To Make the South Safe for Democracy 356
  • Index 365
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