Independence and Foreign Policy: New Zealand in the World since 1935

By Malcolm McKinnon | Go to book overview

1. Introduction: independence and foreign policy

The idea of independence is a favoured theme in discussion of New Zealand's foreign relations and the country's place in the world over the last half century and more. It is both the most common and the most valued interpretation. Not only do many accounts stress New Zealand's increasing independence, but most of their authors have also approved of such a development1. Critical writing is most often directed at identifying New Zealand's lack of independence, not questioning the validity of the goal.2

I do not want to challenge directly the importance of independence in the historical analysis of New Zealand's foreign relations in the present century. Indeed it is precisely because over the last five to six decades so much ink has been spilt in discussing independence that it seems worth standing back and examining the discussion rather than taking 'independence' as a given.

For New Zealand, it is impossible to separate out the notion of independence from the country's status as a part of the British Empire, a 'self- governing colony' since 1856, a 'Dominion' since 1907. The word 'independence' was used in varying ways to identify the relationships of component parts of the Empire to the whole. Four meanings are important for this study. All have been known and understood in New Zealand. Two have been habitually rejected, two as habitually accepted as appropriate. The two rejected meanings were the independence of secessionist nationalism and the

____________________
1
Including, F. L. W. Wood, New Zealand in the World. Wellington, 1940; The New Zealand People At War: Political and External Affairs. Wellington, 1958; J. C. Beaglehole, a number of shorter pieces including, for example, "International and Commonwealth Relations" in Horace Belshaw , ed., New Zealand. Berkeley, 1947; T. C. Larkin, ed., New Zealand's External Relations. Wellington 1962 (hereafter NZER); Henderson, J., R. Kennaway and K. Jackson, Beyond New Zealand. Auckland, 1980; Colin James, The Quiet Revolution. Wellington, 1986; David Lange, Nuclear Free: The New Zealand Way. Wellington, 1990. And numerous shorter statements by politicians, diplomats and scholars, many of which have appeared in periodical publications, notably External Affairs Review (hereafter EAR), subsequently New Zealand Foreign Affairs Review (hereafter NZFAR), and in occasional publications of the New Zealand Institute of International Affairs (NZIIA) including its journal New Zealand International Review (NZIR), bimonthly since 1976.
2
See particularly the writing in Tomorrow ( 1934-40), Here and Now ( 1949-57), New Zealand Monthly Review ( 1960-) (hereafter Monthly Review), and, for economic issues especially, works by W. B. Sutch, Wolfgang Rosenberg and Bruce Jesson.

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Independence and Foreign Policy: New Zealand in the World since 1935
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 330

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.