The Eye that Never Sleeps: A History of the Pinkerton National Detective Agency

By Frank Morn | Go to book overview

tive work lasted well into the twentieth century and became every bit as important as warring on criminals. It seems that Pinkerton's, and those satellite agencies that spun off the mother business, felt compelled to convince the public, their own personnel, and competing agencies of the respectability of private detection. They were creating and sustaining their own version and constantly trying to correct the picture created by others. Perhaps, too, it was because so many of their deeds were interpreted as villainous that Pinkerton's sought so hard to appear as heroes.


Acknowledgments

The preparation of this book has incurred many debts to colleagues. Neil Harris, Arthur Mann, and John Cawelti at the University of Chicago were very helpful at the early stages of this work. Richard Wade and Mark Haller provided useful insights as well.

The Regenstein Library at the University of Chicago, and the manuscript staffs at the Chicago Historical Society and the Library of Congress made my labors less laborious. A summer at Pinkerton's Incorporated Archives was very important. George F. O'Neill graciously tolerated my academic intrusions in the corporate work environment.

Thanks go to Susan Carter-Call, Linda Padera, Irene Rojas, Mary Scesnewicz, and Mary Pallen for various typings of the manuscript. The Center for Research in Law and Justice at the University of Illinois Chicago Circle was generous in providing its facilities to expedite my work.

Ultimate responsibility for the factual and interpretative content of this book, however, remains mine.

-xi-

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