Japanese Women Writers: Twentieth Century Short Fiction

By Noriko Mizuta Lippit; Kyoko Iriye Selden | Go to book overview

The Smile of a Mountain Witch

Ohba Minako

I would like to tell you about a legendary witch who lives in the mountains. Her straggly gray hair tied with string, she waits there for a man from the village to lose his way, meaning to devour him. When an unknowing young man asks to be put up for the night, the owner of the house grins, a comb with teeth missing here and there clutched between her teeth. As he feels a cold chill run up and down his spine beholding this eerie hag of a woman, her yellowed teeth shining under the flickering lamp, she says, "You just thought 'What an uncanny woman she is! Like an old, monster cat!' didn't you?"

Startled, the young man thinks to himself, "Don't tell me she's planning to devour me in the middle of the night!"

Stealing a glance at her from under his brows, the man gulps down a bowl of millet porridge. Without a moment's hesitation she tells him, "You just thought in your mind, 'Don't tell me she's planning to devour me in the middle of the night!' didn't you!"

The man, turning pale, quickly replies, "I was just thinking that with this warm bowl of porridge I finally feel relaxed, and that my fatigue is catching up with me." But with his body as hard as ice, he thinks to himself, "The reason she's boiling such a big pot of water must be because she is preparing to cook me in it in the middle of the night!"

With a sly grin, the old witch says, "You just thought to yourself, 'The reason she's boiling such a big pot of water must be because she is

____________________
Yamauba no bishō ( 1976). Translated by Noriko Mizuta Lippit, assisted by Mariko Ochi, with the permission of the author.

-194-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Japanese Women Writers: Twentieth Century Short Fiction
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Introduction - Noriko Mizuta Lippit and Kyoko Iriye Selden ix
  • The Family of Koiwai 3
  • The Full Moon 20
  • Blind Chinese Soldiers 41
  • Narcissus Hayashi Fumiko 46
  • Residues of Squalor 58
  • Memory of a Night Sata Ineko 84
  • Love in Two Lives: the Remnant 97
  • Ants Swarm 112
  • To Stab Uno Chiyo 126
  • Facing the Hills They Stand Tomioka Taeko 138
  • Congruent Figures 168
  • The Smile of a Mountain Witch 194
  • Yellow Sand 207
  • In the Pot 217
  • Glossary 265
  • About the Authors 269
  • About the Translators 285
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 288

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.