Discovering the News: A Social History of American Newspapers

By Michael Schudson | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

THIS BOOK had its origin in a discussion with David Riesman five years ago. In that conversation, I expressed my interest in tracing the social history of important modern values. If there is a history of ideas and a sociology of knowledge, is there not also a history of ideals and a sociology of values? It is a long way from that general question to a specific study of objectivity in American journalism. But it was David Riesman's sensitive response to my first, tentative articulation of an idea that helped me take the idea seriously. I am indebted to him for the unceasing generosity of his mind and spirit.

In an earlier version, this work was a doctoral dissertation in the Department of Sociology at Harvard University. It concerned the history of the ideal of objectivity in American law and in American journalism. While the work on the legal profession is not represented here, the discipline of comparing two occupational groups was very important to me, and my discussion of journalism would have been the poorer without it. My dissertation advisers, Daniel Bell and Morton Horwitz, demonstrated a personal interest in my project and in me which was far beyond any call of duty. I am enormously grateful for their intellectual and moral support.

Many others helped me through the dissertation. In reading my manuscript and encouraging my work Cora Brooks, Robert Manoff, and Robert Snow were more helpful than I know how to say. Robert Post's detailed criticism of several chapters was very important. Richard Schuldenfrei's intelligent and infectious enthusiasm for my efforts was indispensable.

As I turned the dissertation into a book, more friends and colleagues came to my aid. For reading the entire manuscript and advising me on it, I acknowledge the help of Morris

-ix-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Discovering the News: A Social History of American Newspapers
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 228

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.