The Oxford History of the British Empire - Vol. 3

By William Roger Louis; Andrew Porter et al. | Go to book overview

LIST OF CONTRIBUTORS
SUSAN BAYLY ( Ph.D., Cambridge) is Fellow, Tutor, and College Lecturer, Christ's College, Cambridge University. She is the author of Saints, Goddesses and Kings: Muslims and Christians in South Indian Society, 1700-1900, and has forthcoming Caste, Society and Politics in India from the Eighteenth Century to the Modern Age for the New Cambridge History of India.
PETER BURROUGHS ( Ph.D., London) is former Professor of History at Dalhousie University. His publications include The Canadian Crisis and British Colonial Policy, 1828-1842. He is Joint Editor of the Journal of Imperial and Commonwealth History.
P. J. CAIN (B.Litt., Oxford) is Research Professor at Sheffield Hallam University. He is the author (with A. G. Hopkins) of British Imperialism: Innovation and Expansion, 1688-1914; and British Imperialism: Crisis and Deconstruction, 1914- 1990.
RAEWYN DALZIEL. ( Ph.D., Wellington) is Professor of New Zealand History at the University of Auckland. Her books include The Origins of New Zealand Diplomacy; and Julius Vogel: Business Politician. Much of her recent work has explored the place of women in New Zealand society.
DONALD DENOON ( Ph.D., Cambridge) was formerly Professor of History at the University of Papua New Guinea and is now Professor at the Australian National University. His books include A Grand Illusion: The Failure of Imperial Policy in the Transvaal Colony and Settler Capitalism: The Dynamics of Dependent Development in the Southern Hemisphere.
DAVID FITZPATRICK ( Ph.D., Cambridge) is Associate Professor of Modern History and a Fellow of Trinity College, Dublin. His works include Politics and Irish Life, 1913-1921: Provincial Experience of War and Revolution; Irish Emigration, 1801-1921; Oceans of Consolation: Personal Accounts of Irish Migration to Australia; and The Two Irelands, 1912-1939.
E. H. H. GREEN ( Ph.D., Cambridge) is Fellow of Magdalen College, Oxford. He is the author of several articles on British political economy in the late nineteenth

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