The Oxford History of the British Empire - Vol. 3

By William Roger Louis; Andrew Porter et al. | Go to book overview

26
Southern Africa, 1795-1910

CHRISTOPHER SAUNDERS AND IAIN R. SMITH

During the course of the nineteenth century the growing British presence profoundly shaped South Africa. At the beginning of the century there was no certainty that British rule would continue; by 1900 all of modern South Africa had come under British rule, and British influence had spread far beyond the borders of what, in 1910, became the Union of South Africa. But the extension of British power and influence in the region, although pervasive, was not straightforward. It occurred on many different levels and by no means only as a result of the decisions of policy-makers in London.

Seizing the Cape from the Dutch in 1795, for strategic reasons during the French Revolutionary wars, Britain acquired a vast new possession in which a Dutch- Afrikaans-speaking white minority, of some 20,000, dominated a much larger black population, made up of over 25,000 slaves, 15,000 Khoikhoi, and in the extreme east, a few thousand Bantu-speaking Africans, part of an African population beyond the colony many times larger than the entire colonial population.1 The processes of colonization and dispossession, which by 1795 had been under way for a century and a half and had decimated the Khoikhoi, were continued and intensified when British rule replaced that of the Dutch East India Company. For Britain not only established a strong military and naval presence on the Cape Peninsula, as the pivot of its South African interests; it also became involved in keeping the peace on the colony's porous and expanding frontiers of white settlement far inland. The struggle between white settlers and African populations for control of the limited well-watered land was marked by recurrent warfare, in which British troops repeatedly intervened to play a crucial role in supporting settlers who were unable on their own to displace African farmers. In the east, British forces helped to clear Ndlambe's Xhosa people from the Zuurveld, west of the Fish River, as early as 1811-12.2 Throughout the nineteenth century the frontier

____________________
1
Cf. Richard Elphick and Hermann Giliomee, eds., The Shaping of South African Society, 1652-1820 ( Cape Town, 1979), p. 360, Table 10.1.
2
Ben Maclennan, A Proper Degree of Terror: John Graham and the Cape's Eastern Frontier ( Johannesburg, 1986); Noel Mostert, Frontiers: The Epic of South Africa's Creation and the Tragedy of the XhosaPeople

-597-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Oxford History of the British Empire - Vol. 3
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 780

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.