From Yalta to Disarmament: Cold War Debate

By Joseph P. Morray | Go to book overview

13
Use of Bacterial and Chemical Weapons

The United States had made clear its policy of freedom to rely on nuclear weapons if war came. It aimed at abolishing war, not at regulating the conduct of war. Evidence now accumulated that bacterial and chemical warfare occupied a similar place in American policy. Forty-eight nations, including the United States, had signed in 1925 the Geneva Protocol outlawing the use of chemical and bacterial warfare. Six of the signatories, the United States, Japan, Brazil, Nicaragua, El Salvador and Uruguay, had failed to ratify the protocol. In 1947 President Truman removed it from the calendar of the Senate as "outmoded."

In the early months of 1952 the North Korean and Chinese authorities accused the United States of using germ warfare in Korea. The United States government categorically denied these charges and asked that the International Committee of the Red Cross, a Swiss organization, be allowed to investigate the facts. The Red Cross offered to send a commission of experts in epidemiology from Switzerland and non-Communist Asian countries ("Asian countries not taking part in the conflict"). The Chinese and Koreans rejected this offer and invited instead an international commission of their own selected experts.* The report of this commission, on the basis of anomalous

____________________
*
The commission had the following members: Dr. Andrea Andreen ( Sweden), Director of the Central Clinical Laboratory of the Hospitals Board of the City of Stockholm. Dr. Fraco Graziosi ( Italy), Assistant in the Institute of Microbiology, University of Rome. M. Jean Malterre ( France), Director of the Laboratory of Animal Physiology, National College of Agriculture, Grignon; formerly Livestock Expert, UNRRA; Corresponding Member of the Italian and Spanish Societies of Animal Husbandry. Dr. Joseph Needham ( United Kingdom), F.R.S., Sir William Dunn, Reader in Biochemistry, University of Cambridge; formerly Counsellor (Scientific), British Embassy, Chungking, and later Director of the Department of Natural Sciences, UNESCO. Dr. Oliviero Olivo ( Italy), Professor of Human Anatomy in the Faculty of Medicine, University of Bologna; formerly Lecturer in General Biology, University of Turin. Dr. Samuel B. Pessoa ( Brazil), Professor of Parasitology, University of Sao Paulo; formerly Director of Public Health for the State of Sao Paulo; Honorary Professor in the Faculties of Medicine, Universities

-209-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
From Yalta to Disarmament: Cold War Debate
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 368

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.