The NE X discussion of pleasure concludes with this passage:

Those [pleasures] which are admittedly disgraceful plainly should not be said to be pleasures, except to a perverted taste; but of those that are thought to be good, what kind of pleasure or what pleasure should be said to be that proper to man? Is it not plain from the corresponding activities? The pleasures follow these. Whether, then, the complete and blessed man has one or more activities, the pleasures that complete these will be said in the strict sense to be pleasures proper to man, and the rest will be so in a secondary and fractional way, as are the activities. (1176 a 22-29)

To identify the pleasure or pleasures that are par excellence human, we have only to identify the best human activity or activities. This, one might think, should be easy, since did not Aristotle say at the beginning that the best activity is the exercise of reason in accordance with virtue, thus deliberately directing our attention to the moral virtues and practical wisdom? But does that formula refer to one kind of activity or more than one? And if to more, are they equally expressive of our nature at its best? This is Aristotle's topic for the rest of NE X and ours in the next chapter. There may have been one or two hints earlier in the Ethics that these questions could arise, but Aristotle begins to face them only now. Perhaps the discussion of pleasure is what finally provokes the questions, and perhaps this is because that discussion shapes answers which could not have emerged before. If, for example, there is reason to doubt whether one kind of human rational activity, even at its finest, is as pleasant as one other, the connections just forged between pleasure and nature would prompt the conclusion that the former should not be awarded the title of 'highest human activity'.


Notes
1.
But note Gosling and Taylor's arguments (Chapter 15) against the traditional view that the treatment in X is later.
2.
By Owen.
3.
Cf. Gosling and Taylor, 264-65.
4.
Every one of the issues touched on in this paragraph is studied with immense thoroughness by Gosling and Taylor, Chapters 11-15.
5.
Aristotle, like Plato and almost every other philosopher, does not question that pleasure and pain are contraries. But see Ryle.
6.
200 b 12-24.
7.
Cf. Gosling and Taylor, 277-81.
8.
As Gosling and Taylor assume, 280.
9.
See Waterlow, 183-91, for discussion and references. See also M. J. White [2].
10.
Speusippus, for one. See Gosling and Taylor, 294-96, for speculations about antihedonist opponents outside the Academy.
11.
For discussion of the evidence ( Phys. 247 a 15-19; Rhet. 1369 b 33-35; 1371 a 31-34), see Gosling and Taylor, 194-99.
12.
This was probably not a single theory but a theme common to several positions.
13.
See below, Chapter 7, Section X.
14.
Cf. Meta. 1008 b 12-27, against those who claim to hold that the same thing is both P and not P.
15.
See also Movement of Animals 700 b 28-29; Meta. 1072 a 27-28.

-363-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Ethics with Aristotle
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Foreword vii
  • Acknowledgements ix
  • Contents xi
  • Chapter 1 Happiness, the Supreme End 3
  • Notes 54
  • Chapter 2 Virtues and Parts of the Soul 57
  • Notes 118
  • Chapter 3 the Voluntary 124
  • Notes 174
  • Chapter 4 Practical Wisdom 179
  • Notes 260
  • Chapter 5 Incontinence 266
  • Notes 307
  • Chapter 6 Pleasure 313
  • Notes 363
  • Chapter 7 Aristotle's Values 366
  • Notes 433
  • Works Cited 439
  • Name Index 445
  • Subject Index 449
  • Index Locorum Aristotelis 453
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 466

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.