Baptismal Instructions

By Saint John Chrysostom; Paul W. Harkins | Go to book overview

THE FIFTH INSTRUCTION

Exhortation to the Neophytes to Abstain from Softness, Extravagance, and Drunkenness, and to Esteem Moderation above All Things1


LET US FIND NO PRETEXT FOR LAXITY IN THE PASCHAL FEAST

1. Beloved, even if the fasting is over, let the piety remain. Even if the time of the holy quarantine2 has gone by, let us not put aside the memory of it. Let no one feel displeasure at this exhortation; for I do not say it to impose on you another period of fasting,3 but because I wish you both to relax and to display now a more exact kind of fasting--but the true one. For it is possible for one who is not fasting to fast.4 How is this? I shall tell you. While on the one hand we are taking food, let us, on the other, abstain from sin. For this is the fasting which helps us, and it is with this fasting in view that we abstain from food, so that we may more easily run in the course of virtue. Therefore, if we wish both to take proper care of the body and to keep the soul free from sin, let us take heed and act accordingly.

2. This manner of fasting will be easier for us. Regarding the other kind, I mean abstaining from food, I used to hear many a man say he found it difficult to endure the burden of want of food, and blame the weakness of his body, and utter many other bitter laments, saying that his health was being ruined because he had to go without a bath and had to confine his drinking to water.5 No such excuse is

-80-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Baptismal Instructions
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Introduction 3
  • The First Instruction 23
  • The Second Instruction 43
  • The Third Instruction 56
  • The Fourth Instruction 66
  • The Fifth Instruction 80
  • The Sixth Instruction 93
  • The Seventh Instruction 104
  • The Eighth Instruction 119
  • The Ninth Instruction (montf. 1 and Pk 1) 131
  • The Tenth Instruction (papadopoulos-Kerameus 2) 147
  • The Eleventh Instruction (papadopoulos-Kerameus 3) 161
  • The Twelfth Instruction (montfaucon 2) 173
  • Notes 193
  • Indexes 339
  • Indexes 341
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 380

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.