Baptismal Instructions

By Saint John Chrysostom; Paul W. Harkins | Go to book overview

THE TWELFTH INSTRUCTION
(Montfaucon 2)

To Those About to Be Baptized. On Women Who Adorn Themselves with Braided Hair and Gold. On Those Who Make Use of Omens, Amulets, and Incantations, All of Which Are Foreign to Christianity.1

1. First I have come to ask your loving assembly2 for the fruits of my recent discourse. For I do not speak only that you may hear, but that you may remember what I said and give me proof of it by your deeds; rather, you must give proof to God, who knows your secret thoughts. This is why my discourse is called a catechesis, so that even when I am not here my words may echo in your minds.3

2. Do not be surprised if after only ten days4 I have come to ask for the fruits of the seeds which I have sown. For it is possible on a single day both to sow the seed and to reap the harvest, since we are summoned to the contest relying not on our own strength but relying on the power which is ours thanks to the help of God.5 Let all who received my words and fulfilled them in deeds keep straining forward.

3. Let all who have not yet put their hand to this good work begin now, in order that they may drive off by their future zeal the condemnation which comes from negligence. For it is possible, yes, it is possible even for one who has been extremely negligent to show himself zealous thereafter and, with the passage of time, to recover his entire loss. Therefore, the Psalmist says: Today if you shall hear his voice, harden not your hearts, as in the provocation.6 He says this,

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Baptismal Instructions
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Introduction 3
  • The First Instruction 23
  • The Second Instruction 43
  • The Third Instruction 56
  • The Fourth Instruction 66
  • The Fifth Instruction 80
  • The Sixth Instruction 93
  • The Seventh Instruction 104
  • The Eighth Instruction 119
  • The Ninth Instruction (montf. 1 and Pk 1) 131
  • The Tenth Instruction (papadopoulos-Kerameus 2) 147
  • The Eleventh Instruction (papadopoulos-Kerameus 3) 161
  • The Twelfth Instruction (montfaucon 2) 173
  • Notes 193
  • Indexes 339
  • Indexes 341
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