main outlines of the growth of each poet's mind and art as a whole but to illuminate individual poems and to cite passages in the poet's prose which testify to the genesis of such poems and which help to define and round out the poet's ideas. While there may be those who will think that the notes are needlessly full and that they include things the teacher may himself wish to say, long and realistic experience in the classroom has suggested that a slight repetition, from different angles, is not an unmitigated evil, especially where abstruse philosophical questions are involved. Furthermore an attempt has been made, by citing or quoting widely divergent interpretations and opinions, to make the notes suggestive rather than dogmatic and thus to leave the teacher free to develop his own point of view and to encourage the student to sharpen his critical evaluation.I am grateful to Mrs. Hazen Carpenter for help in checking portions of the bibliographies in this book.H. H. C.
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
The editor very gratefully acknowledges the kindness of publishers and individuals in giving specific permission to include material indicated:
D. Appleton-Century Company: for quotations from T. W. Whipple's Spokesmen.
Coward-McCann, Inc.: for a passage from Alfred Kreymborg's Our Singing Strength.
Doubleday, Doran and Company: for selections from Walt Whitman's Leaves of Grass.
Ginn and Company: for an extract from Percy H. Boynton's History of American Literature.
Harcourt, Brace and Company: for quotations from Henry Seidel Canby's Classic Americans and Foerster's Reinterpretation of American Literature.
Harper and Brothers: for passages from the Letters of James Russell Lowell, edited by Charles Eliot Norton .
Houghton Mifflin Company (by permission of and by arrangement with): for poems and prose selections by Emerson, Holmes, Longfellow, Lowell, and Whittier, and for quotations from Foerster's American Criticism, Ferris Greenslet's Lowell, Albert Mordell's Quaker Militant, H. E. Scudder's James Russell, Lowell, and E. C. Stedman's Poets of America.
The Judson Press: for quotations from A. H. Strong's American Poets and Their Theology.
Little, Brown and Company and Martha Dickinson Bianchi: for the poems by Emily Dickinson.
The Macmillan Company: for poems by Vachel Lindsay and Edwin Arlington Robinson, and for passages from W. A. Bradley's Bryant, Charles Cestre's An Introduction to Edwin Arlington Robinson, and The Cambridge History of American Literature.
Mr. Alfred Noyes and Frederick A. Stokes Company: for passages from Mr. Noyes's Some Aspects of Modern Poetry.
The Saturday Review of Literature ( January 18, 1936) and the author: for an extract from F. O. Matthiessen 's article on Emily Dickinson.
Charles Scribner's Sons: for poems and prose extracts from the work of Sidney Lanier, poems by Edwin Arlington Robinson, and a passage from Edgar Lee Masters's Vachel Lindsay.
The University of North Carolina Press: for passages from A. H. Starke's Sidney Lanier.

-vii-

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Major American Poets
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Contents ix
  • Philip Freneau 1
  • William Cullen Bryant 61
  • John Greenleaf Whittier 105
  • Ralph Waldo Emerson 191
  • Edgar Allan Poe 243
  • Henry Wadsworth Longfellow 287
  • James Russell Lowell 435
  • Oliver Wendell Holmes 543
  • Emily Dickinson 603
  • Sidney Lanier 611
  • Walt Whitman 651
  • Vachel Lindsay 733
  • Edwin Arlington Robinson 755
  • Notes Chronological, Bibliographical, Critical 779
  • William Cullen Bryant 788
  • John Greenleaf Whittier 798
  • Ralph Waldo Emerson 817
  • Edgar Alian Poe 834
  • Henry Wadsworth Longfellow 847
  • James Russell Lowell 860
  • Oliver Wendell Holmes 882
  • Emily Dickinson 893
  • Sidney Lanier 903
  • Walt Whitman 914
  • Vachel Lindsay 929
  • Edwin Arlington Robinson 938
  • General Principles of Poetics 948
  • General Index 951
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