RALPH WALDO EMERSON

CHRONOLOGY
1803 Born, Boston, Mass., May 25, son of a Unitarian clergyman.
1817-21 After poverty-stricken youth and preparation at Boston Latin School, graduated from Harvard College. Began keeping a Journal in 1820.
1825 After trying school-teaching, studied for ministry.
1826-27 Went to Florida for his health.
1829 Became associate pastor of Second Church of Boston. Married Ellen Tucker, who died in 1831.
1832 Became indifferent to rites such as the Lord's Supper, and resigned pastorate.
1832-33 Went to Italy, France, and England, finding his heroes— Landor, Coleridge, Wordsworth, and Carlyle—"deficient in insight into religious truth."
1834 Made ancestral Concord, Mass., his home.
1835 Married Lydia Jackson.
1836 Nature, the core of most of the doctrines he later developed. Attacked traditionalism in religion and defended immanence. His son Waldo born.
1837 "The American Scholar"," read before the Harvard society of Phi Beta Kappa.
1838 "Divinity School Address" at Harvard caused "tempest in a tea-pot" because of his doctrine of a deity depersonalized and immutable, an ever-present beneficent law.
1840-44 Wrote for The Dial, the organ of Transcendentalism. Emerson was editor 1842 1844, after Margaret Fuller.
1841 Essays, First Series.
1842 His son Waldo died.
1844 Essays, Second Series.
1847 Poems. Second visit to Europe.
1847-48 Delivered lectures on "Representative Men" in Europe, renewing friendship with Carlyle with whom he corresponded from 1834 to 1878. This Correspondence was published in 1883.
1849 Nature, Addresses and Lectures collected and published.
1850 Representative Men published.
1855 Championed abolition and woman's suffrage.
1856 English Traits.
1857 Began writing for Atlantic Monthly under Lowell's editorship, continuing his lyceum lecturing. With Lowell, Holmes, Longfellow, Hawthorne, Motley, Agassiz, organized the Saturday Club.
1860 The Conduct of Life (essays), including "Fate" and "Illusions."
1867 May-Day and Other Pieces, his second volume of poems.
1868-70 Lectured at Harvard on "Natural History of the Intellect"."
1870 Society and Solitude. Mellow essays such as Works and Days.
1871 Visited California.
1872 Mind began to fail. Third trip to Europe; visited Egypt.
1873 ff. Venerated as a sage.
1875 Letters and Social Aims.
1876 Made his last entry in the Journal.
1882 Died in Concord, April 27.

BIBLIOGRAPHY
I. BIBLIOGRAPHY
Cooke, G. W. A Bibliography of Ralph Waldo Emerson. Boston: 1908. (Exhaustive up to its pubdate. Pp. 205-309 list studies about Emerson.)
Steeves, H. R. Bibliography of Emerson in The Cambridge History of American Literature. New York: 1917. I, 551-566. ("It includes in particular all the publications of importance which have appeared [up to 1917] since Mr. Cooke's volume.")
II. TEXT
Complete Writings, ed. by J. E. Cabot. Riverside Edition. Boston: 1884-1993. 14 vols.; Riverside popular edition. Boston: 1926. Vols. 13 and 14 contain Cabot's Memoir.
Complete Works of. Ralph Waldo Emerson. Centenary Edition. Boston: 1903-1904. 12 vols. (Ed. by Emerson's son, with a valuable biographical introduction and detailed notes. The standard edition.)
Hale, E. E. Ralph Waldo Emerson:Together with Two Early Essays of Emerson. Boston: 1904. (The two essays are "The Character of Socrates", 1820, and "The Present State of Ethical Philosophy", 1821, with an address on Emerson by Hale, pp. 9-53.)
Correspondence between Ralph Waldo, Emerson and Herman Grimm, ed. by F. W. Holls. Boston: 1903. Originally published in the Atlantic Monthly, XCI, 467-479 ( April, 1903).
Emerson's Journals, ed. by Edward Emerson and Waldo Emerson Forbes. Boston: 1909-14. 10 vols.
Uncollected Lectures of Ralph Waldo Emerson, ed. by Clarence Gohdes. New York: 1932.
Uncollectcd Writings, Essays, Addresses, Poems, Reviews and Letters by Ralph Waldo Emerson, ed. by C. C. Biglow. New York: 1912.
The Heart of Emerson's Journals, ed. by Bliss Perry . Boston: 1926.
The Correspondence of Thomas Carlyle and Ralph Waldo Emerson, 1834-1872, ed. by C. E. Norton. Revised edition, Boston: 1888. 2 volse.

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Major American Poets
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Contents ix
  • Philip Freneau 1
  • William Cullen Bryant 61
  • John Greenleaf Whittier 105
  • Ralph Waldo Emerson 191
  • Edgar Allan Poe 243
  • Henry Wadsworth Longfellow 287
  • James Russell Lowell 435
  • Oliver Wendell Holmes 543
  • Emily Dickinson 603
  • Sidney Lanier 611
  • Walt Whitman 651
  • Vachel Lindsay 733
  • Edwin Arlington Robinson 755
  • Notes Chronological, Bibliographical, Critical 779
  • William Cullen Bryant 788
  • John Greenleaf Whittier 798
  • Ralph Waldo Emerson 817
  • Edgar Alian Poe 834
  • Henry Wadsworth Longfellow 847
  • James Russell Lowell 860
  • Oliver Wendell Holmes 882
  • Emily Dickinson 893
  • Sidney Lanier 903
  • Walt Whitman 914
  • Vachel Lindsay 929
  • Edwin Arlington Robinson 938
  • General Principles of Poetics 948
  • General Index 951
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