JAMES RUSSELL LOWELL

CHRONOLOGY
1819 Born in Cambridge, February 22.
1838 Could not read in person the class poem he had written for his graduation from Harvard, since he was rusticated to the care of a Concord minister for misdemeanors at college.
1840 Graduated from Harvard Law School.
1841 A Year's Life and Other Poems.
1843 Co-editor with Robert Carter of The Pioneer:A Literary and Critical Magazine, which was discontinued after three months.
1844 Poems. Married to Maria White, who was interested in poetry and the anti-slavery cause. Editorial writer for Pennsylvania Freeman.
1845 Conversations on Some of the Old Poets.
1845-48 Anti-slavery writing. Connected with the National Anti-Slavery Standard; corresponding editor, 1848.
1848 Poems (2 vols.). A Fable for Critics.The Biglow Papers, first series. The Vision of Sir Launfal.
1851-52 Traveled in Europe.
1853 Wife died.
1855 Smith professor of the French and Spanish languages and literatures and professor of belles-lettres at Harvard in succession to Longfellow.
1855-56 Studied in Germany and Italy.
1857 Editor of the Atlantic Monthly. Married Frances Dunlap.
1864 Associated with C. E. Norton a joint-editor of the North American Review; contributed vigorous prose pieces which appeared as Political Essays, 1888. Fireside Travels.
1865 Ode Recited at the Harvard Commemoration.
1867 Biglow Papers, second series. (These had previously appeared in Atlantic Monthly, 1862-65.)
1868 Under the Willows.
1870 The Cathedral.Among My Books.
1871 My Study Windows.
1872 Resigned professorship. Third visit to Europe.
1876 Among My Books, second series. Delegate to Republican Convention.
1877 Three Memorial Poems. Minister to Spain until 1880.
1880-85 Minister to England.
1884 "Democracy", address.
1885 Wife died. Diplomatic service ended.
1885-90 Four visits to England.
1886 Democracy and Other Addresses.
1888 Heartsease and Rue.
1891 Died at Cambridge, on August 12. Latest Literary Essays and Addresses.
1892 The Old English Dramatists.

BIBLIOGRAPHY
I. Bibliography
Campbell, Killis. "Bibliographical Notes on Lowell", Univiersity of Texas Bulletin, Studies in English, No. 4, pp. 115-117 ( 1924). (To Lowell's list of published writings, Mr. Camp bell adds one poem [ "Lover's Drink Song"] and four prose pieces. He gives the first place of publication of ten pieces and calls attention to variant versions of six pieces.)
Chamberlain, J. C., and Livingston, L. S. First Editions of the Writings of James Russell Lowell. New York: 1914 (A valuable list of items printed as individual volumes, as pamphlets, or in volumes such as annuals. Does not include items which appeared in magazines or newspapers.)
Cooke, G. W. A Bibliography of James Russell, Lowell. Boston: 1906. (A masterly compilation, indispensable for all serious students because it gives the date and place of first publication of all Lowell's writings, a great many of which are not included in his collected works, and because it lists all notices and criticisms of his work by others to 1906.)
Joyce, H. E. "A Bibliographical Note on James Russell Lowell", Modern Language Notes, XXXV, 249-250 ( April, 1920). (To the seven known poems by Lowell in The Pioneer, Joyce adds "The Poet and Apollo" in the January issue and the "Song" [ "Oh Moonlight deep and tender"] in the February issue.)
Scudder, H. E. James Russell Lowell:A Biography. Boston: 1901, II, 421-447. (The pages indicated contain a chronological list of Lowell's writings, with date and place of first publication.)
II. Text
Writings. Riverside Edition. Boston: 1890. 11 vols. Prose, I-VII; Poems, VII-X; Latest Essays.
Writings. Standard Library Edition. Boston: 1891. 11 vols. (Printed from plates of the Riverside Edition, with contents of individual volumes unchanged. Scudder's Life in 2 vols. added in 1902.)
Complete Writings. Elmwood Eddition. Boston: 1904. 16 vols. ("This edition varies from the Riverside Edition of 1890 in the retention of the original titles of the volumes of prose essays."—Publishers' note in Vol. I. Includes Letters of Lowell [3 vols.], and Scudder's Life [2 vols.].)
Complete Poetical Works. Household Edition. Boston: 1895.

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Major American Poets
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Contents ix
  • Philip Freneau 1
  • William Cullen Bryant 61
  • John Greenleaf Whittier 105
  • Ralph Waldo Emerson 191
  • Edgar Allan Poe 243
  • Henry Wadsworth Longfellow 287
  • James Russell Lowell 435
  • Oliver Wendell Holmes 543
  • Emily Dickinson 603
  • Sidney Lanier 611
  • Walt Whitman 651
  • Vachel Lindsay 733
  • Edwin Arlington Robinson 755
  • Notes Chronological, Bibliographical, Critical 779
  • William Cullen Bryant 788
  • John Greenleaf Whittier 798
  • Ralph Waldo Emerson 817
  • Edgar Alian Poe 834
  • Henry Wadsworth Longfellow 847
  • James Russell Lowell 860
  • Oliver Wendell Holmes 882
  • Emily Dickinson 893
  • Sidney Lanier 903
  • Walt Whitman 914
  • Vachel Lindsay 929
  • Edwin Arlington Robinson 938
  • General Principles of Poetics 948
  • General Index 951
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