OLIVER WENDELL HOLMES

CHRONOLOGY
1809 Born at Cambridge, Mass., August 29.
1824 Entered the orthodox stronghold, Phillips Academy, Andover, which only served to strengthen his already formed aversion to Calvinism.
1825 Entered Harvard.
1829 Graduated from Harvard, his revulsion against Calvinism strengthened by Unitarian influences there.
1830 Wrote verses for Harvard Collegian and Boston Amateur. Began and abandoned course of study for legal profession. Became well known through his popular "Old Ironsides".
1831-32 Articles by Holmes in the New England Magazine under title The Autocrat of the Breakfast-Table foreshadowed the articles twenty-five years later.
1833-35 Studied medicine in Paris, and traveled in France, Holland, Switzerland, Italy, England.
1836 Received M.D. from Harvard and began practice of medicine in Boston. Published Poems the humor of which did not help his medical reputation. Won Boylston prize for medical essay at Harvard.
1838-40 Professor of anatomy at Dartmouth.
1840 Married Amelia Lee Jackson.
1843 "The Contagiousness of Puerperal Fever", his best medical essay, and still recognized as important, aroused controversy in medical profession.
1847 Professor of Anatomy and Physiology at Harvard. 1847-1853, Dean of the Harvard Medical School.
1853 Delivered in Boston a Lowell Institute course of twelve lectures on The English Poets of the Nineteenth Century.
1857-58 The Autocrat of the Breakfast-Table appeared in the Atlantic Monthly. Published as book. 1858.
1860 The Professor at the Breakfast-Table.
1861 Elsie Venner, a novel.
1862 Songs in Many Keys.
1864 Soundings from the Atlantic.
1867 The Guardian Angel, a novel.
1872 The Poet at the Breakfast-Table.
1875 Songs of Many Seasons.
1879 John Lothrop Motley:a Memoir.
1880 The Iron Gate and Other Poems.
1882 Emeritus Professor.
1883 Medical Essays. Pages from an Old Volume of Life.
1885 A Mortal Antipathy, a novel. Ralph Waldo Emerson in the American Men of Letters Series.
1887 Our Hundred Days in Europe. Before the Curfew and Other Poems.
1891 Over the Teacups.
1894 Died in Boston on October 7.

BIBLIOGRAPHY.
I. BIBLIOGRPHY
Ives, G. B. A Bibliography of. Oliver Wendell Holmes. Boston: 1907. (Practically exhaustive. Pp. 243-286 contain a list of all biographies and criticism dealing with Holmes to 1907.)
II. TEXT
Works. Riverside Edition. Boston: 1891. 13 vols. (In 1892 the Memoirs, of Motley and Emerson were printed together, and the volume was added to the Riverside Edition as Vol. XI, the numbers of the three volumes of poems being changed to XII, XIII, and XIV.)
The Writings of Oliver Wendell Holmes. Standard Library Edition. Boston: 1892. 13 vols. (Printed from the plates of the Riverside Edition. The contents of the different volumes are the same, except that the poems occupy only two volumes, XII and XIII. Vol. XII contains the poems included in Vol. XI and the first 158 pages of XII of the Riverside Edition. After the publication of Morse's Life and Letters, those two volumes were added to the Standard Library Edition as Vols. XIV and XV.)
The Complete Poetical Works of Oliver Wendell- Holmes, ed. by H. E. Scudder. Cambridge Edition. Boston: 1895. (The standard one- volume edition, with many useful head-notes and a chronological list of the poems, pp. 341-344.) "Oration", in The New England Society Orations. New York: 1901. Vol. II, pp. 271-302 (This oration by Holmes in 1855 throws light on his political views, especially his view of the slaves as imperfectly human and in need of the compassionate protection of the whites, and his view of the greatness of the New England Federalistic tradition.)
"Four Letters Addressed to Coleman Sellers of Philadelphia", Yale Review, n.s. XIV, 410-413 ( Jan., 1925).
"Hawthorne", Atlantic Monthly, XIV, 98-101 ( July, 1864).
"Irving's Power of Idealization", Critic, III, 138- 139 ( March 31, 1883).
"Letter from Dr. Holmes [to Arthur Gilman], October 26, 1874", Atlantic Monthly, C, 715 ( Nov., 1907).
"Light of Asia" [review of Sir Edwin Arnold's poem], International Review, pp. 345-372 ( Oct., 1879).
"Old Books", [ Buckingham's] New England Magazine, II, 46-49 ( Jan., 1832).
"To John Pierpont, April 3, 1865" [a birthday poem], Bookman, XLIV, 626, ( Feb., 1917)

-882-

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Major American Poets
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Contents ix
  • Philip Freneau 1
  • William Cullen Bryant 61
  • John Greenleaf Whittier 105
  • Ralph Waldo Emerson 191
  • Edgar Allan Poe 243
  • Henry Wadsworth Longfellow 287
  • James Russell Lowell 435
  • Oliver Wendell Holmes 543
  • Emily Dickinson 603
  • Sidney Lanier 611
  • Walt Whitman 651
  • Vachel Lindsay 733
  • Edwin Arlington Robinson 755
  • Notes Chronological, Bibliographical, Critical 779
  • William Cullen Bryant 788
  • John Greenleaf Whittier 798
  • Ralph Waldo Emerson 817
  • Edgar Alian Poe 834
  • Henry Wadsworth Longfellow 847
  • James Russell Lowell 860
  • Oliver Wendell Holmes 882
  • Emily Dickinson 893
  • Sidney Lanier 903
  • Walt Whitman 914
  • Vachel Lindsay 929
  • Edwin Arlington Robinson 938
  • General Principles of Poetics 948
  • General Index 951
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