WALT WHITMAN

CHRONOLOGY
1819 Born on a Long Island farm, May 31.
1823 Family moved to Brooklyn.
1832 Worked for printer of a local paper.
1836-39 Taught school on Long Island. Worked on newspapers part of time.
1841-48. Period of journalism and politics. His temperance tract, Franklin Evans, or the, Inebriate ( 1841), a great success. Campaigned for Polk, 1844.
1848 Although never a fanatical abolitionist, he resigned editorship of the Democratic Brooklyn Daily Eagle when the proprietors criticized his anti-slavery articles. Trip to New Orleans; returned by way of Chicago.
1849-55 Worked with his father at carpentering. Did considerable reading, which included Homer, Epictetus, Scott. In 1849 he edited the Brooklyn Freeman (exponent of the Free-Soil Party) and during the next two years he wrote for periodicals.
1855 Leaves of Grass published, gaining for author an enthusiastic letter from Emerson. Working people indifferent to it. Second edition, 1856.
1855-61 Interested in poetry and politics. Made friends among all classes of people in New York. Edited Brooklyn Daily Times, 1857- 1859.
1860 Enlarged third edition of Leaves of Grass. Other editions in 1867, 1871, and 1876.
1863-73 In Washington. During war gave time and strength to wounded in hospitals. Several government clerkships, one of which he lost when his superior discovered he was the author of the supposedly indecent Leaves of Grass. Period terminated by paralytic stroke which left him with broken health.
1865 Drum-Taps.
1871 Democratic Vistas (prose).
1874-84 Lived with George Whitman at Camden, N. J. 1884, bought small cottage.
1882 Final edition, Leaves of Grass. Specimen Days, prose.
1888 Another paralytic attack. November Boughs published.
1891 Good-Bye, My Fancy.
1892 Died at Camden on March 26.

BIBLIOGRAPHY
I. Bibliography
Allen, G. W. "Walt Whitman Bibliography, 1918- 1934", Bulletin of Bibliography Pamphlets, No. 30. Boston: 1935. (Practically exhaustive for the dates indicated, this bibliography brings the lists in the Cambridge History of American Literature nearly up to date. Includes not only editions and reprints of Whitman, but also all studies about him.)
Holloway, Emory, and Saunders, Henry S. In the Cambridge History of American Literature, 1918, II, 551-581. (The most extensive basic bibliography, including poetry and prose published in periodicals.)
Shay, Frank. The Bibliography of Wall Whitman. New York: 1920. (Excellent up to its date. Does not include works about Whitman.)
Wells, Carolyn, and Goldsmith, A. F. A Concise Bibliography of the Works of Wall Whitman. Boston: 1922. (Includes fifty books about Whitman.)
II. Text
Leaves of Grass. Including Sands at Seventy. 1st Annex, Good-Bye My Fancy; 2d Annex, A Backward Glance O'er Travel'd Roads." Philadelphia: 1891-1892. (The last edition personally supervised by Whitman.)
The Complete Writings of Walt Whitman. Issued under the editorial supervision of his literary executors, Richard Maurice Bucke, Thomas B. Harned, and Horace L. Traubel. With additional bibliographical and critical material by Oscar Lovell Triggs. New York: 1902. 10 vols. (The standard edition of Whitman's writings: for items not included, see below.)
Leaves of Grass. Inclusive Edition, ed. by Emory Holloway . Garden City, N. Y.: 1925. (The indispensable edition.)
In Re Walt Whitman, ed. by his literary executors, Horace L. Traubel, Richard Maurice Bucke and Thomas B. Harned. Philadelphia: 1893. (Includes three early reviews of Leaves of Grass written by Whitman himself and published anonymously.)
The Letters of Anne Gilchrist and Walt Whitman, ed. with an introduction by Thomas B. Harned. Garden City, N. Y.: 1918.
The Gathering of the Forces, ed. by Cleveland Podgers and John Black. New York: 1920. 2 vols. (Editorials, essays, etc., written by Whitman as editor of the Brooklyn Daily Eagle in 1846 and 1847.)
The Uncollected Poetry and Prose of Walt Whitman, ed. with an introduction by Emory Holloway, Garden City, N. Y.: 1921. 2 vols. (Includes the early poems and stories and parts of Whitman's notebooks. The long biographical and critical introduction is finely documented and is indispensable for an understanding of the growth of Whitman's mind, although it is perhaps overenthusiastic in its judgment [p. lxxxiii] that Leaves of Grass-is "the greatest single volume America has yet produced.")

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Major American Poets
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Contents ix
  • Philip Freneau 1
  • William Cullen Bryant 61
  • John Greenleaf Whittier 105
  • Ralph Waldo Emerson 191
  • Edgar Allan Poe 243
  • Henry Wadsworth Longfellow 287
  • James Russell Lowell 435
  • Oliver Wendell Holmes 543
  • Emily Dickinson 603
  • Sidney Lanier 611
  • Walt Whitman 651
  • Vachel Lindsay 733
  • Edwin Arlington Robinson 755
  • Notes Chronological, Bibliographical, Critical 779
  • William Cullen Bryant 788
  • John Greenleaf Whittier 798
  • Ralph Waldo Emerson 817
  • Edgar Alian Poe 834
  • Henry Wadsworth Longfellow 847
  • James Russell Lowell 860
  • Oliver Wendell Holmes 882
  • Emily Dickinson 893
  • Sidney Lanier 903
  • Walt Whitman 914
  • Vachel Lindsay 929
  • Edwin Arlington Robinson 938
  • General Principles of Poetics 948
  • General Index 951
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