North Carolina Government & Politics

By Jack D. Fleer | Go to book overview

CHAPTER EIGHT
Interest Groups and Mass Media

When Bill Holman goes to work, he dresses differently than other people who practice his profession. He wears a blue suit, a yellow shirt, and a tie depicting a walleyed pike. Most of his cohorts wear gray pin-striped suits, white shirts, and dotted ties. They carry briefcases containing numerous documents. Holman stands out in the halls of the General Assembly—not only in his attire, but also in his message and his effectiveness. A lobbyist for the Conservation Council of North Carolina and the state chapter of the Sierra Club, Holman was recognized as one of the most influential lobbyists in the 1985-86, 1987-88, 1989-90, and 1991-92 sessions of the General Assembly. 1 As the principal environmental lobbyist in North Carolina, Holman symbolizes important developments that are occurring in the state's politics and in interest group activity. The changes are reflected in the number and variety of interests represented, the techniques used by groups, and the influence of groups in the state's politics. These changes, along with the impact of the media, contribute to a developing political pluralism in the state.

Several trends in North Carolina have significance for interest group activity in the state. In the economy, dominated in the past by a few low-skilled manufacturing industries, manufacturing continues to be important but employment in service, trade, and governmental sectors is expanding to create more diverse economic and political interests. Political party competition is creating more vigorous contests for major offices, while the Democrats continue to hold advantage in less visible offices, in an electorate that is more politically unpredictable. A more assertive and professional legislature vies with an executive that is more often led by a Republican governor in defining the political agenda and determining the state's policy directions. 2 These developments open new areas of political, social, and economic pluralism in

-175-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
North Carolina Government & Politics
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 343

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.