Inside the Wall Street Journal: The History and the Power of Dow Jones & Company and America's Most Influential Newspaper

By Jerry M. Rosenberg | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 2
The Barron Years

The Wall Street Journal must stand for the best that is in Wall Street and reflect that which is the best in United States finance. Its motto is "The Truth in its proper use."

My Creed, CLARENCE W. BARRON

CLARENCE WALKER BARRON bought Dow, Jones & Company in February, 1902. For the next twenty-six years he was the dynamic force in the life of the The Wall Street Journal.

One of Barron's step-granddaughters described him as "a Santa Claus-like figure." Indeed he must have been. Five feet, six inches tall, he weighed about 300 pounds and sported a patriarchal white beard. Instead of a red suit, however, he favored braid-edged morning coats, white-piped waistcoats, and jaunty silk ties.

In the autobiography he started at the age of seventy-two Barron described his early years:

I was born July 2, 1855 (the oldest of 13 children) in the north end of Boston on Cross Street, in a stone house whose front was covered with a green vine growing from the smallest kind of a front garden, and whose rear was marked by a spacious yard surrounded, as I remember, by a low structure topped by terraces, for clothes line work, and largely occupied by several large cats. . . .

Young Clarence attended Boston's English High School, which, coincidentally, was J. P. Morgan's alma mater. When Barron grad-

-21-

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