The Music Criticism of Hugo Wolf

By Hugo Wolf; Henry Pleasants | Go to book overview
gogue. whose name is especially associated with the University of Cambridge. where he was professor of music from 1887 until his death. and with the Royal College of Music. where he was professor of composition from the time of its founding in 1883. He was knighted in 1901.
2.
The term "Turkish music" was given to an early form of military band music inspired by Turkish janissaries. and featuring kettledrums, bass drums, tenor drums, cymbals, triangles. etc.
3.
No such words are put into Susanna's mouth in Da Ponte's Italian original.
4.
The mythical flutist who challenged Apollo to a musical contest. Apollo playing the lyre. Marsyas lost, and paid for his impudence by being tied to a pine tree and flayed.
5.
Wolf was doubtless not unmindful of the fact that Brahms, composer of two serenades, one of them "for full orchestra." had received an honorary doctorate at a concert at Cambridge directed by Stanford as director of the Cambridge University Musical Society in 1877.
6.
Ferruceio Busoni ( 1866-1924). who had attracted Hanslick's attention when he appeared as a child prodigy in Vienna at the age of nine.
7.
Vladimir de Pachmann ( 1848-1933). Russian pianist, then ( 1884) reaching the peak of a notable career. His affinity for Chopin. noted by Wolf. and certain amiable eccentricities. led to his becoming known as the "Chopinzee."

10. Il Matrimonio Segreto
Brahms's Quintet in F

March 23, 1884

Cimarosa's Il Matrimonio Segreto, recently revived at the Court Opera, is no more viable than Piccini's Dido or Paisiello's Cosa rara; 1 two contemporaries of Cimarosa. The memory of all of them is obscured by the sun of Mozart's genius.

Mozart is, in a certain sense, related to them artistically, although not to be numbered exclusively among the Italians. He shares with Cimarosa and his countrymen the Italian vivacity, the unaffected charm and the light flow of musical declamation, but the Italians could never have written a Die Zauberflöte, which could only proceed from the spiritual depths of the Germans. That Mozart could make the best aspects of Italian operatic procedure his own was in no way an infringement of his German nature. Cimarosa, on the other hand, seems to have concerned himself with Mozart, with consequences both agreeable and disagreeable disagreeable for the composer, to whom many a pretty inspiration from The Marriage of Figaro occured while composing Il Matrimonio Segreto (for The Marriage of Figaro was written seven

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