The Music Criticism of Hugo Wolf

By Henry Pleasants; Hugo Wolf | Go to book overview

The inglorious figure of Don Ottavio is made to order for Herr Perschier. 5 About his vocal accomplishment I shall say nothing. Herr Hablawetz6 is, as we all know, a usable Masetto. I have intentionally held Herr Reichmann ( Don Giovanni) to the last in order to end this review of Don Giovanni. which began in the minor, as does the opera, with a strong D major chord. Herr Reichmann, one of the principal ornaments of our opera stage, was the only enjoyable performer among the cast. One rejoiced at his appearance, was bored in his absence. The performance came to life only when he was on hand. Herr Reichmann makes the godless profligate too amiable, however, with the result that one is almost sorry when the devil finally takes him.

1.
Heinrich Bötel ( 1854- ? ) was a native of Hamburg, and principal tenor at the opera there beginning in 1883. He was a great local favorite.
2.
Presumably an allusion to Scherz, Satire, Ironie und tiefere Bedeutung | see footnote to January 27].
3
Emma Baumann ( 1855-1925), a German soprano especially noted as a Mozart singer.
4.
Karl Meixner ( 1815-1888) had been a member of the Court Theater since 1850.
5.
Adolph Peschier ( 1849- ? ), a member of the company from 1881 to 1885.
6.
August Egon Hablawetz ( 1833-1892). Vienna-born bass, a member of the company from 1870 to 1892.

28. Iphigénie en Tauride

November 23, 1884

Direktor Jahn reached down into the deepest recesses of the Court Opera's archives, where lie practically buried the works of one of the noblest composers, and what he brought forth was -- Gluck's Iphigénie en Tauride. The ten years' dust that had settled on the score was carefully brushed away, and now see! Gluck's sublime masterpiece again enters triumphantly into our opera house.

It cannot be said of this opera, as of so many another perfectly decent work, "If I rest, I rust." Gluck's armor (he is said to have had the habit of encasing himself in armor when the euphony began to sound within him) was, indeed, dusty, but it was not rusty, despite the 105 years that had passed since its premiere. Musical Paris at that time was as if enchanted by this work. We all know of the war between the Gluckists and the Piccinists, and with what fervor it was fought. There were bloody battles then, when opinions parted and daggers came together. Yes, in those days one contested with dagger in hand, and not with empty words, brochures, pamphlets or epigrams. As ink is

-81-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Music Criticism of Hugo Wolf
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 291

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.