From Progressivism to Prosperity: World War I and American Society

By Neil A. Wynn | Go to book overview

Notes
1.
Walter Weyl, The New Democracy ( New York, 1914), 1.
2.
Harold U. Faulkner, The Decline of Laissez Faire, 1897-1917 ( Evanston, Ill., and London, 1951); Robert H. Wiebe, The Search for Order, 1877‐ 1920 ( New York, 1967); Henry F. May, The End of American Innocence: A Study of the First Years of Our Own Time, 1912-1917 ( Chicago, 1964); Otis L. Graham, "America at the Turn of the Century," in Graham, ed., Perspectives on Twentieth Century America ( New York and Toronto, 1973), 4; B. Lee and R. Reinders, "The Loss of Innocence: 1880-1914," in M. Bradbury and H. Temperley, eds., Introduction to American Studies ( Harlow, Essex, 1981). May also described the period as "pre-revolutionary or early revolutionary."
3.
Adams to Charles Milner Gaskell, 29 March 1900, in Worthington Chauncey Ford , ed., Letters of Henry Adams (1892-1918) ( Boston and New York, 1938), 279.
4.
Samuel P. Hays, The Response to Industrialism ( Chicago and London, 1957), 50; J. A. Thompson, Progressivism ( South Shields, England, 1979), 8.
5.
For immigration figures see Maldwyn A. Jones, Destination America ( London, 1976), 12, 16, 17.
6.
Frederic L. Paxson, American Democracy and the World War: Pre-war Years 1913-1917 ( 1936; New York, 1966), 59.
7.
John B. Rae, The American Automobile: A Brief History ( Chicago, 1965), 33; Keith Sward, The Legend of Henry Ford ( 1948, New York, 1972), 33.
8.
John G. Clark et al., Three Generations in Twentieth Century America: Family, Community, and Nation ( Homewood, III., 1977), 72-73; Charles N. Glabb and Theodore Brown, A History of Urban America ( New York, 1967), 133.
9.
Upton Sinclair, The Jungle ( Middlesex, England, 1965), 32-33, 34.
10.
Theodore Dreiser, Sister Carrie ( Middlesex, England, 1981), 16, 23, 489; Carl Sandburg, "Chicago," Poetry 3 ( March 1914).
11.
Sward, The Legend of Henry Ford, 51-54; George E. Mowry, The Era of Theodore Roosevelt, 1900-1912 ( New York, 1962), 3; Clark, Three Generations in Twentieth Century America, 68; Alan Valentine, 1913: America between Two Worlds ( New York, 1962), 163.
12.
Mark Sullivan, Our Times: The United States 1900-1925: Volume III Prewar America ( New York and London, 1930), 342; Faulkner, Decline of Laissez Faire, 30-31; Clark, Three Generations, 68.
13.
Sinclair, The Jungle, 98-99, 248-49.
14.
Roland Berthoff, An Unsettled People: Social Order and Disorder in American History ( New York, Evanston, Ill., and London, 1971), 398-99.
15.
Dreiser, Sister Carrie, 39.
16.
Leo Wolman, The Growth of American Trade Unions, 1880-1923 ( New York, 1924), 33-34.
17.
The conclusions of the Commission on Industrial Relations are in Graham Adams, Jr., Age of Industrial Violence 1910-15: The Activities and Findings of the United States Commission on Industrial Relations ( New York and London, 1966), 204-18; see also Rhodri Jeffreys-Jones, Violence and Reform in American History ( New York and London,

-23-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
From Progressivism to Prosperity: World War I and American Society
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • From Progressivism to Prosperity *
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Note on Sources xi
  • Introduction War, Reform, and Social Change— the First World War in American History xiii
  • Notes xx
  • From Progressivism to Prosperity *
  • 1: The Progressive Era American Society, 1900-1914 1
  • Notes 23
  • 2: From Peace to War 1914-1917 26
  • Notes 38
  • 3: Mobilizing the Population for War Propaganda and Civil Liberties 41
  • Notes 61
  • 4: Organizing for War Government, Business, and the Economy 65
  • Notes 82
  • 5: Labor and the War 86
  • Notes 124
  • 6: War, Women, and the Family 133
  • Notes 163
  • 7: Black Americans and the First World War 170
  • Notes 191
  • 8: The Aftermath of War Reconstruction, Red Scare, and the 1920s 196
  • Notes 221
  • Epilogue from Progressivism to Prosperity: the First World War in Perspective 226
  • Notes 236
  • Bibliography 239
  • Index 257
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 268

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.